COURSES TAUGHT
  • Plant Physiological Ecology - BLY 534
  • Biology of Algae - BLY 332
  • General Biology for Majors - BLY 121

Plant Physiological Ecology - BLY534


Biology 434/534 is an investigation into the relatively “new” scientific field of physiological ecology (i.e., the study of how plants function in their environment) and is designed to meet the needs of students majoring in biology, ecology and/or various disciplines in plant biology.  This course explores plant physiology and ecology in an evolutionary context.  Emphasis will be placed on the following questions:

-What can plants do to ensure survival, given both physiological and environmental constraints?

-How do plants tolerate stress?  How do plants avoid or ameliorate stress?

-How do plants acquire and allocate resources?  What are the ecological consequences of such strategies?

 

-To what extent do physiological characteristics enhance and/or ensure ecological success?

Although topics presented herein are primarily of a botanical nature, plant-animal interactions are discussed in detail to include plant defense mechanisms, symbiosis, parasitism and other ecological relationships.  BLY Core 301, 302, 303 and 325 or 431 are prerequisites for this course.

The picture captures an instance of Splinter Hill Bog population of the rare pitcher plant, Sarracenia leucophylla

Biology of Algae BLY 332
Biology 332 encompasses the diversity, evolution and ecology of chloroxybacteria, algae, bryophytes and protistan fungi. It is designed to meet the needs of students majoring in biology and/or disciplines in plant biology. Emphasis will be placed on the fundamentals of algal and plant classification (including taxonomy & some molecular systematics), morphology, physiology and ecology.
BLY Core 301, 302, and 303 prerequisites for this course. Cell Biology (BLY 341) and/or Plant Physiology (BLY 431) are recommended but NOT required

General Biology for Majors - BLY 121
Biology 121 is the first in a two-semester series of an introduction to biological principles. It is designed to meet the needs of students majoring in biology and/or other scientific disciplines (e.g., medical professionals, engineers, educators, etc.). Emphasis will be placed on the fundamentals of living systems, including the molecular constituents of cells, cell structure, metabolism, genetics, evolution and aspects of classification.

On the left: Roadside invasion of the exotic plant, kudzu (Pueraria montana)

 
RESEARCH
 
     
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