Conference on Teaching and Learning

Experiential Learning

Monday, May 8, 2017

 Room: 253      

Time Presentation
10:00 - 10:20 AM

Integrating Service Learning throughout a Bachelor of Science in Nursing Curriculum

By Jill Van Der Like

10:20 - 10:40 AM

"Teamwork, Internships, & Cultural Immersion: How We Assess Experiential Learning"

By Douglas Wilson

 10:40 - 11:00 AM

Sport Management Service Learning: Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Experiential Learning Benefits

By Christopher Keshock

   
11:15 - 11:35 AM

Interprofessional Education: Improving Patient Safety Outcomes with the use of Standardized Patients

By Erin McAdams

11:35 - 11:55 AM

An Experiential Exercise in Entrepreneurship

By Randall Dupont

11:55 - 12:15 PM

Building Experiential Learning into an Online Undergraduate Curriculum in Healthcare Administration

By Angela Hahn

   
01:45 - 02:05 PM

Using a Communication Approach to Create Internship Curriculum in a Healthcare Administration Undergraduate Program

By Melissa Looney

02:05 - 02:25 PM

Sport Media Community Based Learning

By Matthew Ruckman

02:25 - 02:45 PM

Cultural Competencies in Healthcare Education

By Katherine Bydalek

   
03:00 - 03:20 PM

Service Learning and Cultural Immersion in New Orleans

By Scott Liebertz

03:20 - 03:40 PM

Experimental learning projects help students create restorative landscapes for social service clients

By Elizabeth Tofte

03:40 - 04:00 PM

Experiential Learning: Challenges and Rewards in a Design Studio

By Michael Seymour

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Room: Terrace Room

 
 

11:15 AM - 11:35 AM

Reflections on Mentoring and Making a Change in the Lives of Students in Mobile

By Demetrius Semien

 

Back to Agenda

 

Integrating Service Learning throughout a Bachelor of Science in Nursing Curriculum

Jill Van Der Like, Cynthia Smith-Peters, Crystal Bennett, Faith Garrett, Lydia Toenes

University of West Florida

Experiential learning strategies are used to prepare students for roles requiring interdisciplinary collaboration. A service learning framework which emphasized mindfulness was utilized to implement population health concepts throughout the curriculum. Integration of various activities occurred over five courses for approximately 140 junior and senior baccalaureate nursing students. Learning activities were infused across locations including campus-based, local, regional, and international settings. Challenges of this approach consisted of stakeholder buy-in, community acceptance, communication, and cultural barriers. Benefits of service learning provided both students and faculty with real-world awareness, and the opportunity to make a positive impact in the global community. Lastly, faculty gained a holistic perspective regarding intergenerational learning needs of the student population.

 

Teamwork, Internships, & Cultural Immersion: How We Assess Experiential Learning

Douglas Wilson, University of Mobile

Distinct from objective assessments within lecture, research or interactive courses, measurements of academic progression and professional competencies achieved through experiential learning can be more challenging. This presentation is intended to be a case study of such measurements within the School of Christian Studies, specifically addressing our measurements for team participation, internships, and international service projects. Our hope is to begin a dialog for considering a series of "best practices" for assessing experiential learning coursework.

 

Sport Management Service Learning: Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Experiential Learning Benefits

Christopher Keshock, Mitchell Woltring

University of South Alabama

A variety of academic studies in higher education and subsequent variance of service learning contexts naturally create difficulties for researchers to generalize findings and demonstrate a need for more quantitative experimental research into service learning (Burton & Reynolds, 2009). While very useful, quantitative research does, however, have some limitations such as survey bias and preconceptions held by those who manufacture assessment instruments, which may be overcome by incorporating complementary qualitative approaches. In an attempt to systematically collect more insight relative to experiential learning a mixed-method approach was used to examine the sport management service learning experiences of students working various sport and recreation related events (n=756).  Qualitative responses supported the quantitative data in that students liked building upon interpersonal relationships (personal competence). Qualitative responses also suggested students engaged risk management applications and event operational procedures learned in class discussions as having occurred during service learning assignments.  

 

Interprofessional Education: Improving Patient Safety Outcomes with the use of Standardized Patients

Erin McAdams, Katherine Bydalek, Elizabeth Vandewaa

University of South Alabama

Medication errors occur in every healthcare setting, including the home, outpatient, and in healthcare facilities. There are several high-alert medications (HAMs) that are particularly contributory to bad patient outcomes secondary to medication errors. In this study, awareness of medication errors and HAMs was assessed using realistic clinical scenarios involving standardized patients (SPs) interacting with the student groups. This study incorporated learning strategies including technology-based education, active learning, and team-based learning, and brought together faculty from the Harrison School of Pharmacy, the College of Nursing, The College of Allied Health Physicians Assistants Program and the Innovation and Learning Center. Student teams consisted of nursing students, PA students and Pharmacy students. Prior to encountering the SPs, students received educational training on HAMs and their knowledge was measured in a pre-test. Following the patient encounter, knowledge was reassessed, and student evaluation of the encounters was recorded. In all cases, Pharmacy students demonstrated higher knowledge levels of HAMs than did nursing or PA students. Knowledge of certain HAMs showed improvement in all students after the patient and educational experience, including high-risk drug combinations (opioids and benzodiazepines), and treatment for anticoagulant overdose. Overall, students in all groups reported benefit from the experience, including higher levels of comfort with patient interviewing, and feeling that the patient scenarios were realistic enough to help them in their clinical practice. The added benefit of working as part of an interprofessional team was noted by the SPs, who noted interactions among team members provided the best feedback regarding HAMs.

 

An Experiential Exercise in Entrepreneurship

Randall Dupont, Marc Pierre Dupont

Louisiana State University of Alexandria

Entrepreneurship is the engine of economic growth that improves quality of life through jobs, innovation and philanthropy. In recent years, entrepreneurship education programs and course offerings have been on the rise. However, barriers to developing entrepreneurial human capital are inherent in the traditional academic approach to learning where instruction, learning, and environment need to be controlled. Developing an entrepreneurial mindset requires a highly unstructured and unpredictable learning environment where faculty serve as facilitators guiding students through an indeterminate experience. The nature of the entrepreneurial process is simply one of learning by doing, including learning from failure. The presentation focuses on the experiences of an entrepreneurship class that provided real-world consulting advice for the acquisition of a national sports league. While the specifics of the consultation are and will remain proprietary, the presentation will describe project’s task, student activities, technology used, and assessments. The project is analyzed using Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory and Lewin’s Field Theory. 

 

Building Experiential Learning into an Online Undergraduate Curriculum in Healthcare Administration

Angela Hahn, Melissa Looney

University of West Florida

The Department of Health Sciences and Administration at the University of West Florida is home to a fully online undergraduate degree program in health sciences designed to prepare students for careers in healthcare administration. Internships have long been valued as a way of adding meaning to didactic coursework, improving professional skills, increasing career self-efficacy, integrating education, and promoting personal development. Despite their value, developing and implementing an internship program for an online undergraduate degree has many challenges.  Some of these challenges include: designing a mechanism to ensure that students have identified career preferences and internship sites early in their academic career; timely processing of paperwork; legal agreements and background screening prior to the internship; building effective relationships with host agencies; adequately preparing students for the the professional expectations within the healthcare industry; matching students to preceptors;  covering specific theoretical concepts in a manner so that students benefit from direct exposure at the facility's site; identifying meaningful placements; and designing impactful co-curricular pieces to enhance the internship experience. Departments must also carefully plan to ensure that the internship embraces the mission of the program, has strong support from higher administration, invests in talent acquisition, and allocates and protects resources to support the program.  This presentation will address how those challenges are being met and will discuss the curricular, programmatic, and administrative changes which have been implemented to support the internship program and curriculum integration. It will also address the assessment of the internship program and its role in programmatic evaluation.  

 

Using a Communication Approach to Create Internship Curriculum in a Healthcare Administration Undergraduate Program

Melissa Looney, University of West Florida

An internship is a great journey of professional discovery for students. This brand of experiential learning provides students with hands-on experience in their industry and exposure to key elements of their profession through active learning. The University of West Florida’s Department of Health Sciences and Administration has recently integrated a mandatory internship requirement into the curriculum for online Healthcare Administration students. While the internship hours will take place in a healthcare environment, the curriculum that accompanies the training emphasizes professional communication and development. Effective communication is essential in all industries, and healthcare is not immune to this fact. Competent communication skills are cited as a major factor for creating safe and efficient working environments among healthcare teams (Wood, 2011). However, few internship or training programs specifically stress communication competence (Levinson et al., 2010). The pairing of industry exposure and strong communication skills may help students become stronger candidates for employment post graduation. Ensuring that interns are competent in their communication can also ensure safer healthcare work environments. This presentation will focus on the how and why of integrating communication competence into the internship curriculum for healthcare administration students. It will also address how this approach can be used in different disciplines throughout any university setting. Levinson W, Lesser CS, Epstein RM. (2010). Developing physician communication skills for patient-centered care. Health Aff. 2010;29(7):1310–1318 Wood, J. (2011). Who is Talking? Who is Listening—Improving Communication Among Hospital Nurses and Clinicians. RWJF Program Results Report.

 

Sport Media Community Based Learning

Matthew Ruckman, University of West Florida

The experiential learning project I would like to share was funded by the University of West Florida (UWF) Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) and is a community based partnership with the Pensacola Futbol Club (dba. Gulf Coast Texans). The UWF QEP is focused on improving student’s professional communication skills. The Gulf Coast Texans are a not-for-profit parent led youth sports organization with over 1200 athletes and 30 teams in its competitive select soccer program. The experiential learning project included converting existing Sport Media professional communication projects into community based projects. Throughout the course, students are taught foundational skills of written and oral professional media communication. In class instruction included; approaches and styles of reporting, techniques for reporting and interviewing, writing game recaps, writing feature stories, outlining stories, writing for broadcast media, techniques and skills for anchoring broadcasts, and video production. Students enrolled in SPM 3403 Sport Media were typically tasked with creating a number of professional communication products in hypothetical environments. The products included a team media guide, sports figure interview, feature story, and a game recap story. The experiential learning project I would like to share describes the process and outcomes of working with the Texans to allow students to develop and complete similar communication projects in a community based real-world environment. Students, that participated in this project, were assessed on both their written and oral professional communication skills.  

 

Cultural Competencies in Healthcare Education

Katherine Bydalek, Kelly Stauter, Emily, Sawyer Bentley

University of South Alabama

Cultural competencies are fundamental to the educational process of healthcare professionals.  As future healthcare providers, Nurse Practitioner students must be introduced to cultural competencies and encouraged to explore cultures that differ from their own.  Nurse Practitioners may often be the primary healthcare provider for patients from many different cultures.  Nurse Practitioner faculty are revising a core course in the Dual Role (Family Nurse Practitioner and Adult-Gerontological Acute Care Nurse Practitioner) Program to incorporate cultural competencies across the lifespan.  The revised course links cultural competencies with health promotion and disease prevention related to differing cultures.  The learner will engage in several different methods of assessments including a peer reviewed poster presentation and a peer reviewed group PowerPoint presentation.  This course is being revised to improve learner engagement and provide a variety of learner interactions within the course.

 

Service Learning and Cultural Immersion in New Orleans

Scott Liebertz, James Mellis

University of South Alabama

This presentation will be an introduction to a unique service learning and cultural immersion project carried out in New Orleans during Spring Break.  Developed by an English Literature professor at William Paterson University in New Jersey, this experiential learning experience gives approximately 20 students the opportunity to immerse themselves in the culture of New Orleans while providing important service to the community.  The goal of the project is twofold - to provide meaningful assistance to communities in New Orleans that are still struggling economically in the wake of Hurricane Katrina and other challenges, and to provide students with an intensive introduction to the unique cultural contributions of New Orleans and its people.  Students spend a full week offering their labor to community centers, urban gardens, and other organizations, while learning about the unique musical, artistic,geographic and political culture of New Orleans.  This is one of the few service learning projects in the country that incorporates an equal amount of cultural education. 

 

Experimental learning projects help students create restorative landscapes for social service clients

Elizabeth Tofte

Mississippi State University

This project encouraged students to gain and exchange discipline-based knowledge while working with a real client. The project required students in landscape architecture (n=37) and social work (n=38) to study benefits of restorative healing gardens and apply them to the grounds of social service agencies. Students worked in cross-disciplinary teams. Landscape architecture students conducted extensive research on healing gardens built in the region. Social work students interning at social service agencies gathered culturally relevant information. Then, students spent five weeks sharing information and generating solutions for their clients. At the beginning of this project, only one social work student was able to describe what landscape architecture entailed; five landscape architecture students were able to describe what social work entailed. Students were required to take initiative, make decisions, and be accountable for the results of their decisions. By the end of the project, all students understood and appreciated the discipline-based knowledge held by others and were able to articulate their own discipline’s knowledge to real-world clients. Throughout the project, students engaged intellectually, creatively, emotionally, socially, and physically. Faculty provided some guidance, but students learned more from natural consequences, mistakes, successes, and each other. Faculty saw measurable increase in students’ dedication to learning as reflected in time, energy, grades, and focus on this project. Restorative interventions were presented to clients and displayed at a university-sponsored teaching conference. Further research will track interdisciplinary experimental learning projects between landscape architecture and social work students. Students’ application of discipline-based knowledge will continue to be assessed."

 

Experiential Learning: Challenges and Rewards in a Design Studio

Michael Seymour, Peter Summerlin

Mississippi State University

While dealing with an actual client and a ‘real’ world problem can be exciting, motivational and rewarding for students, it poses many challenges for faculty.  Perhaps most serious is the difficulty of finding an assignment that meets the learning objectives of a specific course and also is appropriate in terms of skill level.  But when the project is appropriate, there can be difficulties with the client.  Some clients may not be sympathetic to the needs of students, the academic schedule or the faculty member’s efforts to focus the course on the learning process and not the final product.  The additional time commitment and potential negative outcomes of experiential learning can discourage faculty from tackling such service-learning projects.  Yet when such a project goes well, it can be a powerful--and even emotional--learning experience for students, faculty and clients.   This presentation will explore the benefits and limitations of experiential-learning through the examination of a landscape architecture design studio project from fall of 2016.  The presentation will also include recommendations that amplify the benefits of these types of projects while minimizing potential negatives.  The project assignment was a proposed redevelopment of a contaminated, US EPA Superfund site in a low-income neighborhood in Columbus, Mississippi.  While the clients were very satisfied with the students’ final designs and report, the project posed both predictable and unpredictable difficulties; these difficulties will be frankly discussed in an effort to provide other faculty with an increased understanding of the challenges and rewards of such experiential projects."

 

Reflections on Mentoring and Making a Change in the Lives of Students in Mobile

Demetrius Semien, Spring Hill College

This presentation examines the effects of mentoring on college students who served as mentors for community youth in Mobile. Students embarked on a rather ambitious project in two classes – Juvenile Delinquency and Race and Ethnicity in the U.S. - at Spring Hill College to engage in one-on-one mentoring with students in Mobile to attempt to make a qualitative difference in their lives. A major component of these courses involved participation in mentoring children or adolescents (15 hours; 20 percent of their grade) and writing reflection papers (10 percent of their grade) on their interactions. The youth the college students interact with struggle on substantial levels. For example, some teens are trying to achieve high enough scores on their ACT tests to be able to graduate from high school. Other youth are part of a leadership program at the local juvenile detention center as part of the negative sanctions for their delinquent activities. Thus, mentoring serves as a way to effect change on a significant level and make a considerable difference in the lives of community youth. This presentation will examine how mentoring affects the college students involved as it examines their own comments and reflections about how they perceived their efforts and felt about their engagement in this process.

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