Conference on Teaching and Learning

Posters

Monday, May 8, 2017

Room: Terrace Room

Information for Poster Presenters  

Title

Presenter(s)

A Team-Based Approach to Professional Development for Writing Center Tutors

Franklin Ard

 

Acceptance & Antithesis: A Reflection of a New Instructor on Finding Her Place 

Sara Mathis (withdrawn)

 

Advising Syllabus

Eric Light

 

Creating Significant Learning Experiences in Staff Training

Kristin Odom

 

Culturally Inclusive Online Instruction

Phillip Ward
Chen Liu

 

Flipping your classroom in any space

Ameya Kolarkar

 

Genetics Laboratory High School Summer Internship Glen Borchert
Maura Smolinski

Leadership Practices that Positively Impact Student Literacy Achievement

ANDREA SIMMONS

 

Making an Active Classroom through Classroom Redesign

Karen Peterson

 

The Effects of Academic Contract

Dan Guo

 

The Impact of Consumerism on Student Learning in Higher Education

Melissa Webb

 

Twenty Minute Tuesdays: Using Webinars to Improve Faculty Development in Higher Education

Shelitha McKissick
Sarah Canatsey

 

Using Portfolios to Promote Active Learning in OT Programs

Donna Wooster
Tracy O'Connor

 

 

Information for Poster Presenters

The poster session will be held from 3pm-4pm Monday, May 8th in the Terrace Room. The  posters need to be 36" x 48". Boards   and easels will be provided.  The ILC can help with the printing, but  will need the posters by May 1st.

Each presenter  will be given one minute to give an overview at the beginning of the session. 

Here are two poster templates that you can use.

With USA logo:  36" x 48" poster template

Without USA logo:  36" x 48" poster template

 

Back to Agenda

 

A Team-Based Approach to Professional Development for Writing Center Tutors

Franklin Ard, University of South Alabama

 This poster presentation will explore the potential impact of a team-based approach to professional development for writing center tutors. North (1994) notes that writing centers sometimes face misconceptions about pedagogical legitimacy due to the status of most tutors as student employees, while Johnson and Houston (1994) found ongoing, project-based professional development for tutors to be a means toward overcoming such questionable perceptions. Additionally, Gamboa and Williams (1991) determined that team-building labs led to improved group cohesion among tutoring staff. With these and other research studies in mind, a new professional development initiative for student tutors has been developed and implemented at the University of South Alabama Writing Center. The design, built upon principles of cooperative learning (Gillies & Ashman, 2003), collaborative learning (Gokhale, 1995), and team-based learning (Michaelsen et al., 1982), involves grouping tutors into three teams with distinct purviews within the organization: face-to-face tutoring, e-tutoring, and marketing/outreach. The focus for each team was based upon the most critical areas of the organization’s work with students. In addition, team members were assigned unique roles, including meeting regularly with the manager to discuss ideas and concerns, acting as liaisons to the other members of the tutoring staff, managing team projects, and coordinating communication within the team and from the team to the entire staff. Early results of this initiative have been positive. Preliminary data from researcher journaling, team member surveys, and professional development project samples will be displayed.

 

Acceptance & Antithesis: A Reflection of a New Instructor on Finding Her Place

Sara Mathis, Auburn University

With any new position, expectations intermingle between the new faculty member and the university for which one works.  Sometimes those expectations are met and others are rejected.  This discussion explores what acceptances I felt at my new institution as well as the antithesis, or unacceptance of my expectations.  For example, I experienced instant acceptance from my students, and I exceeded most of their expectations. However, my expectations for how I was able to teach were definitely the antithesis for what I was accustomed.  While this changed slightly after my first semester, my second semester presented another quandary when I started teaching in a program where the make-up of my classes was all international students.  I could not ascertain my level of acceptance amongst my students.  Was I meeting their expectations?  Moreover, was I meeting the goal of the program and other instructors?  Unfortunately, after becoming more involved, I wondered did I even want to be accepted?  In this case, antithesis was tempting.  Besides teaching, there were departmental expectations that included learning my place in my department.  My expectations did not match at all and at several points I did not even want acceptance only the opposite. Eventually, I stopped fighting and began to transition.  I began to accept some limitations, but in some instances I found a way to work the system.  In the end, honing my teaching skills through participation in professional development activities eased my transition, increased my level of acceptance, and slightly tamed my need for antithesis.

 

Advising Syllabus

Eric Light, University of South Alabama

Over the past 50 years, academic advising has moved from a prescriptive scheduling service to a learning experience that exists parallel to the academic curriculum. This presentation will explain briefly the shift in advising from a registration service to a developmental process that includes learning outcomes designed to foster student success. 

Advisors can facilitate the same type of learning in students surrounding the entirety of an academic curriculum that teachers bring to their classroom (Lowenstien, 2005). In How Learning Works (Ambrose, 2010), learning is defined as a process of change in knowledge, beliefs, behaviors or attitudes.  Ambrose makes the point, that learning can’t be “done” to students. Rather it is something that occurs in response to experiences. In courses, experiences are intentionally designed to engage students in the manipulation of information through guided practice and performance designed to illicit increased understanding.  One effective method to providing these intentional experiences is to have specific goals for the learning process, which are generally seen on course syllabi.  These same concepts of intentionality can be applied to out of classroom experiences as well.  In academic advising, we recognize a series of learning goals and deliberately transform those into outcomes. Then, we construct experiences that require students to engage with specific material that should, again in the best case, result in learning.  As an example of these concepts, the FYAC developed an Academic Advising Syllabus to that serves to guide our interactions with student and bring intentionality towards desired learning outcomes. 

 

Creating Significant Learning Experiences in Staff Training

Kristin Odom, University of South Alabama

Dr. Dee Fink developed the “Taxonomy for Significant Learning” in the early 2000's, an interactive rather than hierarchical approach to help answer the question “What constitutes significant learning?”  Using the six major types of this taxonomy (including sub categories), Fink presents transformational active teaching styles to create lasting learning.

Although Dr. Fink has published many works and presented about the use of the Taxonomy of Significant Learning as the foundation for student curriculum, no one has applied his taxonomy to staff training in a higher education workplace.  According to the National Business Trends Survey 2017 by the Employers Association Forum, the most difficult employees to retain are entry-level workers.  Professional development is sometimes offered, but can be costly and time-sensitive. 

The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not integration of Dee Fink’s Taxonomy of Significant Learning with staff training creates successful retention and transfer of material.

The pedagogical model created will be constructed around the six categories of Fink’s Taxonomy of Significant Learning: foundational knowledge, application, integration, human dimension, caring, and learning how to learn.  Content-centered approaches will be blended with learner-centered approaches to improve active learning and engagement while increasing long-term retention.  The methodology will include primarily qualitative research with a small quantitative component.  Findings will be analyzed through participant coding to review common themes.

Any leader of organizations or departments in higher education can utilize these findings to create professional development.  Intended recommendations for future research include providing training in a fully online environment.

 

Culturally Inclusive Online Instruction

Phillip Ward, Chen Liu

University of South Alabama

The University of South Alabama has over 1,200 international students enrolled in 2016 and this number is expected to grow. International students pay out-of-state tuition, which positively contributes to USA’s revenue growth. This phenomenon is not unique to USA. The international student populations at colleges and universities across the country are expanding, along with the demand for online courses. However, cultural differences can have a negative impact on students’ participation and satisfaction with online courses. For higher education institutions, such as USA, to remain competitive, special attention should be paid to the different educational values and cultural expectations of all participants. The Culturally Inclusive Online Instruction model can provide a learning environment which considers diversity in course design to ensure the full participation of domestic and international students. This model can be used as guidance to design courses in which online participants have more interaction, with fewer instances of miscommunication.

 

Flipping your classroom in any space

Ameya Kolarkar, Auburn University

We shall talk about different ways to engage students in flipped learning activities in a Studio style classroom as well as a large lecture hall. Some preliminary data and results will be presented on our study of different physical spaces. We shall also present results on our use of Learning Assistants (LAs) and assessments. LAs are an important tool to facilitate active learning in any type of class, particularly in large classes. The take-away for this presentation will be to look for solutions to flip a class rather than focus on the impediments. 

 

Genetics Laboratory High School Summer Internship

Glen Borchert, Maura Smolinski

University of South Alabama

Two local high school sophomores, from inner city schools,  were  awarded a paid summer internships in the Dr. Borchert’s genetics lab at the University of South  Alabama. Both students were members of under represented groups in the sciences. The genetics laboratory studies regulation of gene expression by small RNAs. The students assisted lab graduate students, participated in college searches, researched college entry requirements, and worked on ACT preparation with a graduate student from the College of Education and Professional Studies.

 

Leadership Practices that Positively Impact Student Literacy Achievement

Andrea Simmons, University of South Alabama 

While the overall day to day operations of a school have not changed much over the years, the roles and responsibilities of the school principal has seen a dramatic shift in recent history (Hull, 2012). The overall role, value, and effectiveness of principals have been a source of great debate and research. “They can no longer function simply as building managers, tasked with adhering to district rules, carrying out regulations, and avoiding mistakes. Principals must be instructional leaders capable of developing a team of teachers who deliver effective instruction to every student” (Wallace Foundation, 2013, p. 6). The primary responsibility of a principal is to facilitate effective teaching and learning with the overall mission of improving student achievement. The purpose of this study is to examine whether student achievement is related to select leadership characteristics at the elementary level. I will investigate the leadership characteristics of principals who are charged with leading schools that are scoring in the successful range on standardized reading assessments, as well as, the leadership characteristics of principals who are charged with leading schools that are not scoring in the successful range. This study will examine leadership characteristics and how they are related to successful student achievement on the reading portion of high stakes assessments.

 

Making an Active Classroom through Classroom Redesign

Karen Peterson, University of South Alabama

Have you ever planned activities for an active learning experience in your classroom only to have the activities fall short of goals?  Think about classroom redesign.  How can the way you set up your classroom help you engage your students and get them into discussion and team work.  This presentation will show how universities are creating active classrooms from the ground up and creating a dynamic classroom.  See how active learning classrooms are already being created at the University of South Alabama.  Data on the effect of such a classroom on student sense of belonging and social engagement will also be presented.

 

The Effects of Academic Contract

Dan Guo, University of South Alabama

This poster will show a part of the findings of my dissertation titled The Effects of Academic Contract on Academic Achievement and Motivation in a Freshmen Biology Class

This was a mixed method study with two historical comparison classes with quizzes in 2013 and 2015, and a treatment class with an academic contract in 2016. A posttest-only design was used in these three classes. There were 114, 111, and 137 students respectively. A one group pretest-posttest design was used in the 2016 treatment class. Students in this 2016 class signed an academic contract agreeing to complete five activities and completed the pretest Science Motivation Questionnaire (SMQ) at the beginning of the semester. At the end of the semester, they completed the final exam, posttest SMQ, and the class climate course evaluation.  

The independent variable was the academic contract. The dependent variables included the final exam grades, the SMQ scores, the class attendance, the course satisfaction, and the activity grades.

The data found that students loved the use of the academic contract with activities because it was flexible, fun, enjoyable, relaxing, and effective. Students liked to have options and do the activities which they felt confident they could do. They thought the academic contract was a more effective way to learn than quizzes because the activities related knowledge to real-life situations. 

 

The Impact of Consumerism on Student Learning in Higher Education

Melissa Webb, University of South Alabama

The impact of consumerism in higher education has been well documented over the past thirty years. Consumerism has allowed education to gradually shift from a process to a product. The relationship of an institution and a student resembles a business exchange, whereby many students view earning a degree as a means to an end, rather than an immersive learning experience. In addition, the massification of higher education and increased competition for students has led to a culture of academic entitlement, grade inflation, and passive learning.

Students who do not engage in deep learning, risk the ability to learn multiple perspectives, think critically, and learn with understanding. This results in graduates incapable of handling complex tasks, limited capacity for flexibility, and a resistance to change. The researcher hypothesizes that the higher the consumerism attitude the more likely a surface or strategic learning approach is perceived as standard. A mixed method approach will be conducted to test the hypothesis and further expand the knowledge of the effect that consumerism has on higher education learning.

Student attitudes influence behavior in learning, and even for students who are motivated to learn, a culture of consumerism may mold them into surface or strategic learners This study intends to fill a gap in the literature by determining whether student consumerism leads to a surface and/or strategic learning outcome. The results will help increase understanding of consumerism’s impact on learning.

 

Twenty Minute Tuesdays: Using Webinars to Improve Faculty Development in Higher Education

Shelitha McKissick, Sarah Canatsey

University of South Alabama

Instructors in higher education have little time to attend workshops for faculty development.  Face to face workshops are not always accessible to all faculty members. In recent years, webinars have been a popular choice for online professional development.  Instructors no longer have to travel outside of their offices or homes to attend webinars, and in many cases, even if the events are at a time that the faculty cannot attend synchronously the webinars can be recorded and shared to be viewed at a later time.

Traditional webinars are usually an hour in length. Fitting an hour webinar into an already busy day can be difficult.  Making webinars shorter may make the workshops more appealing.  A questionnaire will be sent to find the time of day that is best for instructors, and topics of importance will be polled.

 Twenty Minute Tuesdays can be used to introduce topics that the Innovation in Learning Center presents in more depth at workshops, in how-to guides, and with faculty assistance. The webinars may increase attendance with instructors who have not yet engaged in faculty development through the Innovation in Learning Center. 

 

Using Portfolios to Promote Active Learning in OT Programs

Donna Wooster, Tracy O'Connor

University of South Alabama

Portfolio assessment continues to be a growing trend for advanced credentialing in occupational therapy (OT). Some OT programs have initiated the development of portfolios to assist students with the active learning process as they progress towards more professional reasoning and writing.  This presentation will describe how portfolios are used by OT Program Directors throughout the United States. We will address programs that are requiring the portfolio, documents most commonly included in the portfolio, and how and when portfolios are used, graded, and assigned. An online questionnaire was sent to all OT Program Directors, n=60.

Top