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Tuberculosis
 
  • What is tuberculosis?

Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs. But, TB bacteria can attack any part of the body such as the kidney, spine, and brain. If not treated properly, TB disease can be fatal. TB disease was once the leading cause of death in the United States.

TB is spread through the air from one person to another. The bacteria are put into the air when a person with active TB disease of the lungs or throat coughs or sneezes. People nearby may breathe in these bacteria and become infected.

However, not everyone infected with TB bacteria become sick. People who are not sick have what is called latent TB infection. People who have latent TB infection do not feel sick, do not have any symptoms, and cannot spread TB to others. But, some people with latent TB infection go on to get TB disease.

People with active TB disease can be treated and cured if they seek medical help. Even better, people with latent TB infection can take medicine so that they will not develop active TB disease.

  • How can I get tested for TB?

You should get tested for TB if:

    • You have spent time with a person known to have active TB disease or suspected to have active TB disease; or
    • You have HIV infection or another condition that puts you at high risk for active TB disease; or
    • You think you might have active TB disease; or
    • You are from a country where active TB disease is very common (most countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, and Russia); or
    • You live somewhere in the United States that active TB disease is more common such as a homeless shelter, migrant farm camp, prison or jail, and some nursing homes); or
    • You inject illegal drugs.

The TB skin test:

The TB skin test may be used to find out if you have TB infection. You can get a skin test at the Student Health Center, the health department or at your doctor's office. A health care worker will inject a small amount of testing fluid (called tuberculin or PPD) just under the skin on the under side of the forearm. After 2 or 3 days, you must return to have your skin test read by the health are worker. You may have a swelling where the tuberculin was injected. The health care worker will measure this swelling and tell you if your reaction to the test is positive or negative. A positive reaction usually means that you have been infected by someone with active TB disease.

  • What if I have a positive test for TB?

If you have a positive reaction to the TB skin test or the QFT, your doctor or nurse may do other tests to see if you have active TB disease. These tests usually include a chest x-ray. If you have active TB disease, you will need to take medicine to cure the disease.

 

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Date last changed: July 15, 2011 1:32 PM
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