English Course Offerings

The English Department's course offerings vary by semester. We offer 100-level composition courses, 200-level introductory courses, 300-level intermediate courses, 400-level advanced courses, and 500-level graduate courses. For a listing of everything in the departmental catalog, please visit:

http://www.southalabama.edu/bulletin/current/courses/english/index.html

For a listing of courses offered in a given semester, please visit PAWS. Enter the catalog term you wish to search and select "English" as the subject on the following page.


Spring 2019 Undergraduate Course Offerings


Introduction to Literary Study - EH 300 | Steve Trout
TR, 11:00 am to 12:15 pm

Required of all English majors, EH 300 is designed to prepare students for 400-level courses in literature. The class focuses on the basics of literary interpretation and scholarship, with particular emphasis on vocabulary and writing. The texts are, quite simply, among the instructor's favorites of all time. They include The Professor's House by Willa Cather, Lord Jim by Joseph Conrad, In Our Time by Ernest Hemingway, and Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston. A splendid time is guaranteed for all.


Shakespeare's Comedies and Romances - EH 322 | Richard Hillyer
MWF, 10:10 am to 11:00 am

We will read a representative sample of Shakespeare's work in two genres of plays: comedies and romances. Among other classics, we will be studying "The Taming of the Shrew," "A Midsummer Night's Dream," "Twelfth Night," "The Winter's Tale," and "The Tempest." Assignments will consist of two papers, a midterm exam, and a final.


Later 18C Lit: The Power of Feeling (W) - EH 342 | Cris Hollingsworth
MWF, 12:20 pm to 1:10 pm

Through an examination of relevant classics such as The Castle of Otranto, The Sorrows of Young Werther, The History of Mary Prince, Sense and Sensibility, and Jane Eyre, we will explore the rise of the individual experience of trauma and oppression as a marker of authenticity and a politically charged moral force. This force helped fuel the American and French Revolutions and end the slave trade in Europe and the New World; in our own time, contemporary expressions of this experience are once again exciting and changing public discourse and fueling revolution.


American Novel since 1945 - EH 363 | Justin St. Clair
TR, 2:00 pm to 3:15 pm

Heroes are for simpletons. This course is all about the louts and blaggards --- anti-heroes for unheroic times. From the original Homer Simpson in Nathanael West’s The Day of the Locust (1939) to the seductive repugnance of Humbert Humbert in Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita (1955) to the degeneration of Tyrone Slothrop in Thomas Pynchon’s Gravity’s Rainbow (1973), the fiction of postmodernity is chock-full of characters coming apart. As we read a handful of novels from the period, we’ll investigate how postwar literary fiction unravels the corrosive cultural mythology of “heroism.”


Approaches to English Grammar - EH 371 | Larry Beason
TR, 12:30 pm to 1:45 pm

So what is a dangling participle anyway? EH 371 offers students a valuable intellectual and practical skill: the ability to analyze and describe in technical terms how a given sentence is structured (beyond just saying it does or doesn’t “flow”). While the course was originally developed for students planning to teach English courses at the secondary level, EH 371 is useful for just about anyone wanting to edit, write, analyze literary texts, teach non-native speakers of English, practice law, or learn more about the English language. EH 371 is also a W-course and can help fulfill the W-course requirement for English majors and many other students.


Technical Writing - EH 372 | Annmarie Guzy
MWF, 10:10 am to 11:00 am

This course will introduce you to types of written and oral communication used in workplace settings, with a focus on technical reporting and editing. Through several document cycles, you will develop skills in managing the organization, development, style, and visual format of various documents.


Technical Writing - EH 372 | Laura Vrana
TR, 11:00 am to 12:15 pm

All twenty-first-century workplaces require regularly writing and making many types of “documents”—for print or electronic consumption, or both—that are comprised of text, images, and multimedia elements combined. This course prepares students for professional discourse in their chosen careers, focusing on interpreting and adapting to expectations of different audiences and contexts. Emphasis is placed on: visual/aural elements of document/web design; communicating with both those in one's specialized field and general audiences; and effectively compiling longer reports or presentations.


American Civil Rights in Literature - EH 390 | Kern Jackson
TR, 9:30 am to 10:45 am

Over the course of the semester you can expect to read a wide variety of texts in a wide range of genres and modes, ranging from oral history, speeches, and poetry from the 1960s to films, graphic novels and short stories written as recently as this past year. You can expect to compose texts in a variety of different genres and modes over the course of the semester, ranging from traditional literary analysis to visual presentation and a multimodal narrative based on original archival research.


Fiction Writing I/II - EH 391/392 | Nathan Poole
TR, 12:30 pm to 1:45 pm

This course will introduce students to the art of short fiction as well as to contemporary practitioners. In this class, we will read short fiction not so much for "meaning" or "theme" but for technique. We’re interested in how stories are built in order to gain insight into how we might build them ourselves. A popular myth is that good writing is built on inspiration and "natural talent," but the very existence of this course implies otherwise. And nearly every accomplished fiction writer will tell you that his or her success is owing mostly to studied technique, careful reading, and a whole lot of work.


Rhetoric: Ancient and Modern - EH 402 | Patrick Shaw
TR, 2:00 pm to 3:15 pm

Beginning with the early sophists of Periclean Athens and ending in the twenty-first century, this course examines and compares various movements in the history of rhetoric, with particular emphasis on the relationship between rhetorical strategy and one’s image of human beings. The course aims to increase the scope of students’ understanding of rhetoric and help them apply this knowledge to their own communication and to their evaluation of the communications of others


Shakespeare - EH 472 | Richard Hillyer
M, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

We will study all of Shakespeare's sonnets in sequence. The main assignment will be a research paper developed in stages.


19C Literature - EH 475 | Pat Cesarini
TR, 12:30 pm to 1:45 pm

In this survey of literature about the Civil War, we will consider how American writers contended imaginatively for the meaning of both the war and of the United States. We will sample canonical and non-canonical writers--male and female, North and South, soldier and civilian, black and white--and many genres, such as Whitman’s Specimen Days, Melville’s Battle Pieces, DeForest’s Miss Ravenel’s Conversion from Secession to Loyalty, Chesnut’s Diary, Alcott’s Hospital Sketches, and Douglass’s The Life and Times. Graded work will consist of frequent quizzes, two essays, and an exam.


Studies in Film: Adaptation - EH 478 | Becky McLaughlin
MW, 5:00 pm to 6:15 pm and M 6:30 pm to 9:00 pm

Because the theme of this course is adaptation, we will watch films and read the novels, novellas, or short stories upon which they have been based. The two central and interrelated questions we will address are how and why screenplay writers and film directors deviate from or align themselves with the original texts in the ways that they do. In order to tackle these questions, we will pair a novella such as Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness with Francis Ford Coppola’s epic war film, Apocalypse Now, to name but one of the unusual pairings to be covered. A major assignment will be to write a short screenplay.


Advanced Fiction Writing I/II - EH 483/484 | Nathan Poole
R, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

This course is a seminar, writing workshop, and directed-study for intermediate and experienced writers of fiction. Through tailored writing projects that range from short stories, novellas, and novel excerpts, students will learn to utilize peer and instructor feedback that leads to stronger, more original work. Students will also develop a greater understanding of the critical and cultural lineage of their work. Discussions and assignments will address the craft of writers foundational to the study of fiction. Conferences and independent projects will focus on literary journals and the submission process, when appropriate.


Advanced Poetry Writing I/II - EH 485/486 | Charlotte Pence
W, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

This advanced poetry writing course explores the different styles that currently define the American contemporary poem. We will cover political poetry, eco-poetry, ekphrastic poetry and more from the best contemporary poetry being written today. Students will then submit a new poem for workshop in that particular style every week. In so doing, the class will examine the state of the contemporary lyric and ask what are its craft elements that create what Auden defines poetry to be: "memorable speech." To help us gain an understanding of this vibrant field, our class has the opportunity to meet guest poets who include Diana Khoi Nyugen.


Screen Writing II - EH 488 | Adam Prince
W, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

This class focuses on the fundamentals of screenwriting. We will study character development, conflict, structure, formatting, and so on as we explore how to write screenplays. Our focus will be as expansive as possible, covering drama, comedy, and action genres as well as both TV and feature-length scripts. Students will write at least one close analysis of a screenplay in addition to extensive work on an original TV pilot and a feature-length script. Screenplays will be workshopped in class and revised accordingly.


The Hero's Journey (H) - EH 490 | Annmarie Guzy
MWF, 9:05 am to 9:55 am

In this course, we will study the Hero’s Journey in its various iterations around the world. We will explore cultural and generational commonalities among ancient and modern religions, philosophies, mythologies, and fairy tales, demonstrating how they build a universal foundation for the journey to adulthood and/or enlightenment. Selected canonical and contemporary texts will help us to delineate the chronological development of a western tradition of road trip and coming-of-age stories.


Spring 2019 Graduate Course Offerings


Introduction to Critical Theory - EH 501 | John Halbrooks
T, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

This course will survey critical theory from Classical Greece to the twenty-first century, from ancient debates over the nature of representation and the function of literature to the dizzying array of critical lenses offered by contemporary theory. To focus these lenses, we will consider two texts with long and remarkably varied critical histories: Shakespeare’s Othello and Austen’s Pride and Prejudice.


Rhetorical America - EH 507 | Larry Beason
R 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

We will examine how American culture is saturated with rhetoric, and not just in the “bad” sense of the word. We will utilize various approaches to rhetorical analysis as we critique diverse texts—from architecture, to tattoos, to presidential speeches. In everyday America and ‘Merica, we encounter messages concerning power and identity. These can be highly persuasive, especially if we are unaware someone is trying to persuade us. Should we not realize what these messages are—and whether they are manipulative, benign, or “good”?


Renaissance Poetry - EH 514 | Richard Hillyer
M, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

We will study all of Shakespeare's sonnets in sequence. The main assignment will be a research paper developed in stages.


Graduate Fiction Writing I/II - EH 583/584 | Nathan Poole
R, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

This course is a seminar, writing workshop, and directed-study for intermediate and experienced writers of fiction. Through tailored writing projects that range from short stories, novellas, and novel excerpts, students will learn to utilize peer and instructor feedback that leads to stronger, more original work. Students will also develop a greater understanding of the critical and cultural lineage of their work. Discussions and assignments will address the craft of writers foundational to the study of fiction. Conferences and independent projects will focus on literary journals and the submission process, when appropriate.


Graduate Poetry Writing I/II - EH 585/586 | Charlotte Pence
W, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

This advanced poetry writing course explores the different styles that currently define the American contemporary poem. We will cover political poetry, eco-poetry, ekphrastic poetry and more from the best contemporary poetry being written today. Students will then submit a new poem for workshop in that particular style every week. In so doing, the class will examine the state of the contemporary lyric and ask what are its craft elements that create what Auden defines poetry to be: "memorable speech." To help us gain an understanding of this vibrant field, our class has the opportunity to meet guest poets who include Diana Khoi Nyugen.


Screen Writing II - EH 590 | Adam Prince
W, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

This class focuses on the fundamentals of screenwriting. We will study character development, conflict, structure, formatting, and so on as we explore how to write screenplays. Our focus will be as expansive as possible, covering drama, comedy, and action genres as well as both TV and feature-length scripts. Students will write at least one close analysis of a screenplay in addition to extensive work on an original TV pilot and a feature-length script. Screenplays will be workshopped in class and revised accordingly.


Criminal Modernism - EH 592 | Christopher Raczkowski
W, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

When Gertrude Stein, with characteristic swagger, declares that she “killed the nineteenth century, killed it dead like a gangster” with a machine gun; or W.H. Auden writes that “The situation of our time, / Surrounds us like a baffling crime”; or Bertolt Brecht and Walter Benjamin spend a week together in 1933 mapping out a series of detective novels they intend to co-author; we get a quick glimpse at how crime and crime narrative are surprisingly central to modernist art, thought and self-fashioning. Reading work by Stein, Eliot, Larsen, Benjamin, Wright, Highsmith, Faulkner, Auden, Kafka and others, the class seeks both to identify the multiple ways that crime and criminality animates modernism and to speculate on why modernists found crime so valuable to their aesthetic and intellectual projects.


Thesis Hours - EH 599

Please see Dr. Halbrooks if you would like to register for thesis hours and have not already discussed your committee, graduation requirements, etc.