English Course Offerings

The English Department's course offerings vary by semester. We offer 100-level composition courses, 200-level introductory courses, 300-level intermediate courses, 400-level advanced courses, and 500-level graduate courses. For a listing of everything in the departmental catalog, please visit:

http://www.southalabama.edu/bulletin/current/courses/english/index.html

For a listing of courses offered in a given semester, please visit PAWS. Enter the catalog term you wish to search and select "English" as the subject on the following page.


Fall 2016 Undergraduate Course Offerings


Intro to Literary Study - EH 300 | Richard Hillyer
TR, 11:00 am to 12:15 pm

EH 300 is intended primarily to prepare English majors for coursework at the 400 level.  We will be reading an anthology of poetry by various hands and other literary works by Samuel Beckett, Homer, A, A. Milne, and Oscar Wilde.  I will assign two papers, a midterm, and a final.


Shakespeare: Tragedies and Histories - EH 323 | Richard Hillyer
TR, 2:00 pm to 3:15 pm

We will study a representative range of Shakespeare's plays in two genres: tragedies and histories.  I will assign two papers, a midterm, and a final.


The American Novel to 1900 - EH 331 | Pat Cesarini 
MWF, 1:25 pm to 2:15 pm

To experience work from a broader-than-usual range of American fiction in this period, we will read short stories as well as novels by such major and minor writers as Charles Brockden Brown, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Mark Twain, Henry James, William Dean Howells, Hamlin Garland, Kate Chopin, Frank Norris, Jack London, Charles Chesnutt, Stephen Crane, Edith Wharton, Theodore Dreiser, John Oskison, and Harold Frederic.  Along the way we will also explore our writers' relations to the critical concepts of Romanticism, Realism, Regionalism, and Naturalism. For graded work, there will be frequent reading quizzes and two essays of between five and ten pages each.


American Novel From 1900-1945 - EH 362 | Christopher Raczkowski
TR, 12:30 pm to 13:45 pm

This class will examine the American modernist novel of the between-the-wars era. The course readings are organized as a semester long study of some of the important forms that the modernist novel took during the era (popular/hardboiled, high modernist, avant garde and Harlem Renaissance). Along the way, we will consider the shared concerns that collectively allow us to think of them as participating in modernism, as well as the debates or conflicts (about literary form, politics, history, culture) that make them distinct as individual modernisms.


Approaches to English Grammar - EH 371 | Larry Beason
TR, 11:00 am to 12:15 pm

EH 371 offers students a valuable intellectual and practical skill: the ability to analyze and describe in technical terms how a given sentence is structured.  While the course was originally developed for students planning to teach English at the secondary level, EH 371 is useful for just about anyone wanting to edit, write, analyze literary texts, teach non-native speakers of English, practice law, or learn more about the English language.


Technical Writing - EH 372 | Annmarie Guzy
MWF, 10:10 am to 11:00 am

This course will introduce you to types of written and oral communication used in workplace settings, with a focus on technical reporting and editing.  Through several document cycles, you will develop skills in managing the organization, development, style, and visual format of various documents.


Technical Writing - EH 372 | Christine Norris
Two separate sections:  TR, 9:30 am to 10:45 am  or  TR, 12:30 pm to 13:45 pm

In this class we will examine the practical, logistical, and ethical difficulties involved in communicating technical information to an audience.   Students will have the opportunity to write technical documents for real clients and to work on technical documents relevant to their fields of study.


Civil Rights Narrative - EH 390 | Kern Jackson
TR, 9:30 am to 10:45 am

In this course we will examine the Civil Rights Movement with particular attention to making use of the techniques of literary and cultural studies. Developing our critical writing and reading skills we will analyze narrative about the Movement and eventually craft narrative responses of our own. Over the course of the semester you will read a wide variety of texts in a wide range of genres and modes, ranging from oral history, speeches, and poetry from the 1960s as well as films, graphic novels and short stories written as recently as this past year.


Fiction Writing 1 - EH 391 | Linda Parker
M, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

English 391 is the study of the craft elements of creative writing, primarily fiction, but a little creative nonfiction will also be considered.  In our study, we will read selected works, including novels, short stories, personal essays, and some opening pages of memoirs.  Lectures and discussions will examine:  major concepts of creative writing, including conflict and tension, as well as the primary building blocks of creative writing—scenes, half-scenes, narrative summary, and descriptive passages. We will also examine the various forms of structure for creative writing and components of place, style, point of view, voice, character, and figures of speech.  Class discussions will focus on the process of writing from first draft to revision (both concept revision and line editing).  Class time will be divided between lecture/discussion and workshop.  Each week student work will be read and critiqued during the workshop component of the class.  Student manuscripts might be as short as a couple of pages (a scene or two) or might be as long as a novel chapter, depending on the student’s level and on the student’s current writing project.  Thus, the course will accommodate both beginning writers and more advanced writers.  This course is structured around observing and understanding the craft elements in the fiction and non-fiction we read (and demonstrating that understanding in essays that locate and describe these elements).  The course is also structured around classroom discussions, as well as critique aimed at improving each student’s writing.  Each class meeting is divided into lecture/discussion and workshop.


Teaching Composition - EH 401 | Annmarie Guzy
MWF, 9:05 am to 9:55 am

This course will introduce you to theories of composition and their applications for teaching writing at the secondary school level.  In a seminar-style format, you will:

  • learn a variety of pedagogical strategies from the required textbooks;
  • become familiar with the requirements for middle school and high school Language Arts classes as mandated by the Alabama Course of Study;
  • select and lead discussions of articles from English Journal, the NCTE’s publication for secondary English teachers;
  • teach a 50-minute class on an assigned topic in language arts; and
  • design a syllabus or detailed academic unit for a middle school or high school English class, and support it with a research-based rationale.

Literary Criticism to 1900 - EH 421 | John Halbrooks
MWF, 2:30 pm to 3:20 pm

This course will survey some of the major debates about literature beginning with Gorgias, Plato, and Aristotle. What is literature? What does it do, and what is its function? What is the relationship between literature and the world? How do we define and categorize literary form and genre? What is the responsibility of the writer? How can women respond to a predominantly male literary canon? What might constitute productive strategies of literary interpretation?

As we will see, these debates have been ongoing for 2500 years and continue to this day, and these are not merely abstract issues. As funding for education in general and the humanities in particular is on the wane, it is vital for those of us in the field to articulate arguments about the value of what we study. An historical understanding of literary criticism and theory also will enable us to think more deeply about the texts we read and our relationship to them.


Literary Criticism since 1900 - EH 422 | Justin St. Clair
TR, 3:30 pm to 4:45 pm

The primary objective of this course is to provide a broad overview of literary theory since 1900.  We will begin with various formalisms, wend our way through a succession of -isms, schisms, and camps, and finally conclude with a unit on cultural studies.  As we traverse topics ranging from deconstruction to psychoanalysis, from gender studies to post-colonial theory, we will develop a better understanding of the critical approaches literary scholars employ.


Middle English Literature - EH 465 | John Halbrooks
MWF, 11:15 am to 12:05 pm

This course will concentrate on Middle English narrative, from tales of King Arthur to psychedelic dream visions to travelogues. We will contextualize these readings through study of other aspects of the culture of the period and through discussion of the influence that these narratives continue to wield in our own culture.


Monstrous Births, Erroneous Opinions, and Unsavory Speeches:
Religious Commotions in Early American Literature - EH 482 | Becky McLaughlin
W, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

Beginning with the Antinomian Controversy of 1636-38 as documented by David Hall, this variable content course will explore the impact of religion on American literature from the 17th through the 19th century.  The story we generally tell ourselves about our Puritan forbears is one in which a courageous band of faithful Christians create a “city upon a hill” to be a beacon of religious tolerance and good will for the whole world to model itself upon.  But, in fact, from the 17th century’s three “crime waves”--the Antinomian Controversy, the Quaker Persecutions, and the Salem Witch Trials--to the three Great Awakenings of the 18th and 19th centuries, religious controversy and intolerance have been the order of the day.  To see the highs and the lows of our spotted religious history, or “the sluce, through which so many flouds of Error flow in,” we will read the sermons of John Wheelwright, Jonathan Edwards, George Whitefield, and Charles Chauncy; novels such as Wieland, The Damnation of Theron Ware, The Leatherwood God, and The Bostonians; short stories such as Melville’s “The Apple-Tree Table” and Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown”; and the autobiographies of Jarena Lee, Zilpha Elaw, and Julia Foote.


Advanced Fiction Writing I / II - EH 483 / 484 | Linda Busby Parker
W, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

This class is the study of the craft elements of fiction writing (with a little creative nonfiction tossed into the mix). In our study, we will read selected works, including novels, short stories, personal essays, and some opening pages of memoirs. Lectures and discussions will examine: major concepts of creative writing, including conflict and tension, as well as the primary building blocks of creative writing. We will also examine the various forms of structure for creative writing and components of place, style, point of view, voice, character, and figures of speech. Class discussions will focus on the process of writing from first draft to revision (concept revision and line editing). Class time will be divided between lecture/discussion and workshops. Each week student work will be read and critiqued during the workshop component of the class. Since this is an advanced class in writing, students are expected to present a high quality of creative work. Each student is required to present at least three short manuscripts during the semester, and at least one of those manuscripts should be edited and polished. This manuscript might be a novel chapter, a short story, or a piece of creative nonfiction. Students will be working on novels (or novel revisions), on story collections, on major scenes, or on a memoir. The course is also structured around classroom discussions, as well as critique aimed at improving each student’s writing.


Health and Healing in Literature and Film - EH 490 | Cris Hollingsworth
TR, 2:00 pm to 3:15 pm

This course is an opportunity for each student to investigate and reflect upon his or her understanding of health and healing through exploring and discussing selected filmic and literary texts, the perspectives of invited speakers, and personal experience. Our inquiry and conversations will engage with broad, vital topics such as life, death, suffering, compassion, power, and the unknown, through the granular details of represented and direct experience. Evaluation may include both critical and creative responses involving writing and other media. Pre-requisite: students must have been accepted in the Honors Program.


Poetry through Film and Music - EH 492 | Nick Sturm
T, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

What are the relationships between poetry, film, and music? As genres, film and music dominate our conception of popular culture. What can we learn about poetry by reading it through and against these popular genres? How do the aesthetics of cinema, song, and language amplify and intersect one another? This advanced creative writing workshop will seek a range of answers to these questions by initiating an in-depth cross-genre practice of reading and writing by encountering poetry and poetry-related texts with ties to film and music. Students will generate, share, and critique original creative work that explores and experiments with these genres. In addition to a chapbook-length set of traditional written poems influenced by these aesthetic questions, students will also create poem-films and engage with writing processes that utilize music and film as a primary source.


Fall 2016 Graduate Course Offerings


Graduate Writing - EH 502 | Steve Trout
M, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

Students in EH 502 will learn how to write literary analysis at an advanced level and how to present their work at a professional forum. Readings will include numerous samples of quality scholarship and a variety of primary texts, including works by Willa Cather, Joseph Conrad, H.G. Wells, and Ernest Hemingway.   


Teaching College Writing - EH 505 | Patrick Shaw
MW, 1:00 pm to 2:15 pm

This course examines issues in composition history, theory, and pedagogy in the context of teaching first-year composition.  Students will use this knowledge to develop course material appropriate to teaching first-year composition.  Topics include syllabus and assignment design, lesson planning, course management, teaching in the linguistically and culturally diverse classroom, and assessment. Pre-requisite/Co-requisite: EH 502.


Studies in Shakespeare II - EH 517 | Richard Hillyer
R, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

We will study a handful of Shakespeare's histories and tragedies under the rubric "Shakespeare and Film," which is also the title of a book we will use as a guide.  In addition to reading that and seven plays, we will be watching six films during class-time.  The writing assignment will consist of a 20-25 page research paper developed in stages. 


Victorian and Edwardian Prose - EH 538 | Ellen Burton Harrington
MW, 2:30 pm to 3:45 pm

What it means to be British becomes a defining issue in the Victorian and Edwardian periods, encompassing class, race, ethnicity, and difference both within Britain and in the colonies.  Contemporary concerns about evolution and interest in the developing fields of criminal anthropology animate the discussion about nation, class, and race.  This class will focus on the figure of the detective in relation to these issues of nation and empire. We will read Dickens’s Bleak House alongside Dickens’s journalism; Wilkie Collins’s The Moonstone with a selection from Harriet Martineau’s travel narratives; Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and the two Sherlock Holmes novellas “A Study in Scarlet” and “The Sign of Four” with contemporary criminal anthropologist Cesare Lombroso’s problematic theories; Kipling’s Kim with a range of contemporary and current perspectives on empire; and Joseph Conrad’s The Secret Agent in relation to prevailing interest in anarchism, empire, and criminal anthropology.  While looking at the larger issue of being subject to British rule within and outside of Britain, we will consider the ways in which class differences and Irish, Jewish, African, and Indian identity complicate the idea of being British.


Graduate Fiction Writing I / II - EH 583 / 584 | Linda Busby Parker
W, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

This class is the study of the craft elements of fiction writing (with a little creative nonfiction tossed into the mix). In our study, we will read selected works, including novels, short stories, personal essays, and some opening pages of memoirs. Lectures and discussions will examine: major concepts of creative writing, including conflict and tension, as well as the primary building blocks of creative writing. We will also examine the various forms of structure for creative writing and components of place, style, point of view, voice, character, and figures of speech. Class discussions will focus on the process of writing from first draft to revision (concept revision and line editing). Class time will be divided between lecture/discussion and workshops. Each week student work will be read and critiqued during the workshop component of the class. Since this is an advanced class in writing, students are expected to present a high quality of creative work. Each student is required to present at least three short manuscripts during the semester, and at least one of those manuscripts should be edited and polished. This manuscript might be a novel chapter, a short story, or a piece of creative nonfiction. Students will be working on novels (or novel revisions), on story collections, on major scenes, or on a memoir. The course is also structured around classroom discussions, as well as critique aimed at improving each student’s writing.


Monstrous Births, Erroneous Opinions, and Unsavory Speeches:
Religious Commotions in Early American Literature - EH 590
| Becky McLaughlin
W, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

Beginning with the Antinomian Controversy of 1636-38 as documented by David Hall, this variable content course will explore the impact of religion on American literature from the 17th through the 19th century.  The story we generally tell ourselves about our Puritan forbears is one in which a courageous band of faithful Christians create a “city upon a hill” to be a beacon of religious tolerance and good will for the whole world to model itself upon.  But, in fact, from the 17th century’s three “crime waves”--the Antinomian Controversy, the Quaker Persecutions, and the Salem Witch Trials--to the three Great Awakenings of the 18th and 19th centuries, religious controversy and intolerance have been the order of the day.  To see the highs and the lows of our spotted religious history, or “the sluce, through which so many flouds of Error flow in,” we will read the sermons of John Wheelwright, Jonathan Edwards, George Whitefield, and Charles Chauncy; novels such as Wieland, The Damnation of Theron Ware, The Leatherwood God, and The Bostonians; short stories such as Melville’s “The Apple-Tree Table” and Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown”; and the autobiographies of Jarena Lee, Zilpha Elaw, and Julia Foote.


Poetry through Film and Music - EH 592 | Nick Sturm
T, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

What are the relationships between poetry, film, and music? As genres, film and music dominate our conception of popular culture. What can we learn about poetry by reading it through and against these popular genres? How do the aesthetics of cinema, song, and language amplify and intersect one another? This advanced creative writing workshop will seek a range of answers to these questions by initiating an in-depth cross-genre practice of reading and writing by encountering poetry and poetry-related texts with ties to film and music. Students will generate, share, and critique original creative work that explores and experiments with these genres. In addition to a chapbook-length set of traditional written poems influenced by these aesthetic questions, students will also create poem-films and engage with writing processes that utilize music and film as a primary source.


Thesis Hours - EH 599

Please see Dr. Harrington if you would like to register for thesis hours and have not already discussed your committee, graduation requirements, etc.