English Course Offerings


The English Department's course offerings vary by semester. We offer 100-level composition courses, 200-level introductory courses, 300-level intermediate courses, 400-level advanced courses, and 500-level graduate courses. For a listing of everything in the departmental catalog, please visit:

http://www.southalabama.edu/bulletin/coureh.htm

For a listing of courses offered in a given semester, please visit PAWS. Enter the catalog term you wish to search and select "English" as the subject on the following page.


Spring 2015 Undergraduate Course Offerings


Shakespeare: Comedies and Romances / EH 322 | Richard Hillyer
We will read a representative selection of plays in these two genres. Assignments: midterm, final, two short research papers.


British Novel from 1900 to 1945 / EH 364 | Steven Trout
This course will introduce students to seven major works of British fiction published during the first half of the twentieth century: Joseph Conrad’s The Secret Agent, E.M. Forster’s Howard’s End, D.H. Lawrence’s Sons and Lovers, Evelyn Waugh’s Vile Bodies, H.G.Wells’s Tono-Bungay, Rebecca West’s The Return of the Soldier, and Virginia Woolf’s Jacob’s Room. These are all novels built around memorable homes, from Bladesover, the iconic gentry estate in Tono-Bungay to the cramped, working-class domicile of the Morel family in Sons and Lovers. Our discussions will focus on these varied domestic spaces as, among other things, sites of espionage, class warfare, gender conflict, healing, and loss. Please join us.


Approaches to English Grammar / EH 371 | Larry Beason
What are participles anyway, and why do they dangle?  This class offers students a valuable intellectual and practical skill: the ability to analyze and describe in technical terms how a given sentence is structured.  While the course was designed for students planning to teach English at the secondary level, EH 371 is useful for just about anyone wanting to edit, professionally write, analyze literary texts, teach non-native speakers of English, practice law, or learn more about the English language.  This is also designated as a W-course.


Teaching Composition / EH 401 | Annmarie Guzy
This course will introduce you to theories of composition and their applications for teaching writing at the secondary school level. In a seminar-style format, you will:

  • learn a variety of pedagogical strategies from the required textbooks;
  • become familiar with the requirements for middle school and high school Language Arts classes as mandated by the Alabama Course of Study;
  • select and lead discussions of articles from English Journal, the NCTE’s publication for secondary English teachers;
  • teach a 50-minute class on an assigned topic in language arts; and
  • design a syllabus or detailed academic unit for a middle school or high school English class, and support it with a research-based rationale.

Rhetoric: Ancient and Modern / EH 402 | Nicole Amare
This course is designed for individuals who want a better understanding of the history of rhetoric, particularly rhetoric in the Western World.  Rhetoric is often a controversial topic at best, and it is helpful to trace why rhetoric is sometimes given a bad rap in our modern day.  We will study the fundamentals of rhetoric, beginning with the Greeks.  After examining and discussing characteristics, subject matter, and topoi of Classical Rhetoric, we will move swiftly through Medieval, Renaissance, and Enlightenment Rhetoric before grounding ourselves more firmly in the rhetorical traditions of more recent historical time periods.   This method will allow us adequate sampling and understanding of basic rhetorical moves and their conditions that will help us better consume, critique, and produce effective modern and postmodern rhetoric. 


Literary Criticism after 1900 / EH 422 | Pat Cesarini
This course is a survey of the major schools of literary and cultural theory in the 20th and 21st centuries.  By the end of the course you will be able to speak and write knowledgeably and critically about a wide range of theoretical schools, including formalism, structuralism, post-structuralism, feminism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, and several more recent topical, political, and historicist approaches. We will also pursue more intensive study of one particular theorist, theoretical approach, or problematic in literary study, such as genre theory, aesthetics, evocriticism, or post-colonialism.


19th-Century Literature / EH 475 | Ellen Burton Harrington
The prolific periodical culture of the Victorian period produced a rich array of novels and stories, from the lengthy three‑deckers that Henry James famously called “loose, baggy monsters” to the more succinct novels of the end of the century. This class will consider a variety of novels and short stories, both popular and literary, that represent some of the significant political, social, racial, national, and gender undercurrents of the Victorian and Edwardian periods, along with historical and critical work that contextualizes it. We will begin with Charles Dickens’s Oliver Twist (1838), considering the novel’s classic portrayal of the orphan hero grappling with issues like class and crime. We’ll move to Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights (1847), reading the novel as a threshold text between the Romantic and the Victorian periods, and then we will examine George Eliot’s The Mill on the Floss (1860) through its presentation of childhood and Victorian womanhood. Next, we will read Wilkie Collins’s The Moonstone (1868) and consider class, crime, the critique of empire, and developing genres of popular fiction. We will read Stevenson’s novella The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886) and consider crime and the city, developing theories of the mind, manhood, and the implications of Darwin. We will move to Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles (1891) to examine the tragic limitations of Tess’s class and gender positioning. Joseph Conrad’s Edwardian novel The Secret Agent (1906) is another threshold text, treating topical issues like anarchism and women’s rights in a novel that crosses genres, merging the political novel with the domestic novel and the detective novel.


Studies in Composition and Rhetoric:  Food, Politics, and Taste / EH 481 | Christine Norris
In addition to nourishing the body, food operates as a cultural system that produces and reflects group and individual identities. In this class we will examine foodways—the behaviors and beliefs attached to the production, distribution, and consumption of food— and writing about food to explore the way food practices help shape our sense of gender, race, sexual orientation, and national identity. In doing so we will focus primarily on rhetorical theory but will also range into the fields of anthropology, sociology, and history. Some questions under discussion: How do factors such as gender, class, race, and religion shape the foods we eat and the circumstances in which we eat them? How do writers use the language of food to explore issues such as gender, sexuality, class, and race?  Authors may include:  Anthony Bourdain, Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, Pierre Bourdieu, M.F.K. Fisher, David Hume, and Carolyn Korsmeyer.


Studies in American Literature:  Native American Fiction / EH 482 | Pat Cesarini
In this course we will study novels by Native American writers, with particular focus on the work of writers considered part of an 'American Indian Renaissance':  N. Scott Momaday, James Welch, Leslie Marmon Silko, Louise Erdrich, and Sherman Alexie.  We will also consider the relationship between this work and American literature more broadly, with the help of such Native critics and theorists as Paula Gunn Allen, David Treuer, and Jace Weaver.


Special Topics:  Visions of the Post-Apocalypse / EH 490 | Larry Beason
This is an Honors course that focuses on contemporary narratives of life after "the end of the world as we know it."  The course examines not only traditional literary texts, but diverse mediums of recent popular culture (film, television, internet discourses, graphic novels, and video games).  The course allows us to understand how post-apocalyptic narratives reflect and create messages that are relevant to our real-world fears and values.  (Please note:  this offering of EH 490 is available only to students officially enrolled in the USA Honors Program.)


Spring 2015 Graduate Course Offerings


Introduction to Critical Theory / EH 501 | Pat Cesarini
This course is a graduate level introduction to critical theory.  The first part of our work will be a brief survey of major theoretical schools and statements.  The larger part will consist of several units on particular theoretical problematics, such as the nature of literature, the nature of the author, reading as a process, "evo-criticism," cognitive literary criticism, post-human studies, or genre theory.  By the end of the course, in addition to becoming conversant with the issues involved, you will also be able to articulate your own theoretical and critical approaches clearly and persuasively.


Studies in Chaucer / EH 513 | John Halbrooks
Chaucer is at the same time the most welcoming and the most unknowable of poets. His personable narrative voice and his self-deprecating poetic personality seem so simple, and yet they mask dazzling complexity, poetic subtlety, and political ambivalence. He challenges us to imagine human discourse as endlessly dialogic, even as he accepts as the ultimate truth a God that lies beyond the capacities of language. In other words, Chaucer's apparent ambiguity does not imply a categorical rejection of truth itself. It does suggest, on the other hand, as Chaucer's contemporary William Langland expresses in a different way, that truth lies in the very struggle to find it in the complexities of the world. And Chaucer engages with this struggle through poetry and narrative rather than through a systematic attempt to resolve what is, in this world at least, not resolvable. Students will engage with Chaucer's constant reinvention of himself and his restless poetic experimentation through our study of the various iterations of his narrative voice. Students will begin by getting acquainted with Chaucer's Middle English through readings of The Book of the Duchess and The General Prologue to The Canterbury Tales. Then the class will proceed to the rest of the corpus, including the Tales, The House of Fame, and Troilus and Criseyde, as well as reception history.


Restoration and Early 18th-Century Literature / EH 525 | Richard Hillyer
This course will be organized under the theme "Sex and Science in Early Modern England."  Students will develop a research paper through several drafts based on these themes and readings by John Aubrey, Aphra Behn, Abraham Cowley, Samuel Pepys, Alexander Pope, the Earl of Rochester, Thomas Shadwell, Jonathan Swift, James Thomson, and others.


Victorian & Edwardian Prose / EH 538 | Ellen Burton Harrington
The prolific periodical culture of the Victorian period produced a rich array of novels and stories, from the lengthy three‑deckers that Henry James famously called “loose, baggy monsters” to the more succinct novels of the end of the century. This class will consider a variety of novels and short stories, both popular and literary, that represent some of the significant political, social, racial, national, and gender undercurrents of the Victorian and Edwardian periods, along with historical and critical work that contextualizes it. We will begin with Charles Dickens’s Oliver Twist (1838), considering the novel’s classic portrayal of the orphan hero grappling with issues like class and crime. We’ll move to Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights (1847), reading the novel as a threshold text between the Romantic and the Victorian periods, and then we will examine George Eliot’s The Mill on the Floss (1860) through its presentation of childhood and Victorian womanhood. Next, we will read Wilkie Collins’s The Moonstone (1868) and consider class, crime, the critique of empire, and developing genres of popular fiction. We will read Stevenson’s novella The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886) and consider crime and the city, developing theories of the mind, manhood, and the implications of Darwin. We will move to Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles (1891) to examine the tragic limitations of Tess’s class and gender positioning. Joseph Conrad’s Edwardian novel The Secret Agent (1906) is another threshold text, treating topical issues like anarchism and women’s rights in a novel that crosses genres, merging the political novel with the domestic novel and the detective novel.


Studies in Genre / EH 577 | Sue Walker 
This course will test the boundaries of hybrid forms of writing. With specific focus on poetry and creative nonfiction, students will engage in this budding experimental form.


Thesis Hours / EH 599
Please see Dr. Harrington if you would like to register for thesis hours and have not already discussed your committee, graduation requirements, etc.