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Colloquia 2014-2015

Refreshments are served 30 minutes before each talk in the Conference Room
Date Speaker Talk

Current Talks:

Thursday, September 18, 2014 at 3:30 p.m. in ILB 370
This talk is aimed in particular at undergraduate and graduate students.
Scott Carter, University of South Alabama Sierpinski Figures in All Dimensions, The Chaos Game, and Multinomial Coefficients

Abstract: It is well-known among mathematicians that the result of the Chaos Game on 3 equidistant vertices yields a figure that approximates the Sierpinski triangle. It is also known that the binomial coefficients when read modulo 2 resemble this figure. In this talk, I want to show you some interesting n-dimensional generalizations of these phenomena.

Thursday, September 25, 2014 at 3:30 p.m. in ILB 370
This talk is aimed in particular at undergraduate and graduate students.
David Benko, University of South Alabama TBA

Abstract: TBA

Thursday, October 2, 2014 at 3:30 p.m. in ILB 370
This talk is aimed in particular at undergraduate and graduate students.
David Mullens, University of South Alabama TBA

Abstract: TBA

Thursday, October 9, 2014 at 3:30 p.m. in ILB 370 Afh Abede, Auburn University TBA

Abstract: TBA

Thursday, October 16, 2014 at 3:30 p.m. in ILB 370 Nutan Mishra, University of South Alabama Optimal Properties of Variance Balanced Designs

Abstract: It is well known that for a proper block design the combinatorial property of pairwise balance is sufficient to ensure the statistical property of variance balance. The variance balance property of a block design implies the complete symmetry of the information matrix. Using these facts we discuss the optimality in a class of proper variance balanced designs with unequal replications. Further unequal replications force the variance balanced designs to be non- binary designs. Hence instead of using the usual optimality criteria given by J. Keifer, we compare the designs with respect to the functions based on efficiency factors of the design namely eigen values of the matrix (RinverseC)

Thursday, October 23, 2014 at 3:30 p.m. in ILB 370 Nutan Mishra, University of South Alabama Constructing Partially Balanced Incomplete Block Designs from Strongly Regular Graphs

Abstract: TBA

Thursday, October 30, 2014 at 3:30 p.m. in ILB 370 Masaaki Suzuki, Akita University, Japan Meridional and Non-Meridional Epimorphisms between Knot Groups

Abstract: We will consider epimorphisms between knot groups. Especially, we will focus on the image of a meridian under such an epimorphism. A homomorphism between knot groups is called meridional if it preserves their meridians. The existence of a meridional epimorphism introduces a partial order on the set of prime knots. We will determine the pairs of prime knots with up to 11 crossings which admit meridional epimorphisms between their knot groups. Moreover, we will describe some examples of non-meridional epimorphisms explicitly.

Thursday, November 6, 2014 at 3:30 p.m. in ILB 370 David Sprehn, University of Washington TBA

Abstract: TBA

Past Talks:

Thursday, September 11, 2014
This talk is aimed in particular at undergraduate and graduate students.
Cornelius Pillen, University of South Alabama Plutarch’s Box, O’Halloran Numbers, and the Riemann Hypothesis

Abstract: During our last summer camp some Mobile County six graders were given a rectangular prism of size 5 by 2 by 2. They were asked to calculate its surface area and then find another rectangular prism with integer dimensions and identical surface area. While daydreaming in the back of the class I started thinking about these rectangular “integer prisms”. Are there any such prisms whose surface area equals their volume? Can every (large) even number be realized as the surface area of some rectangular prism with integer dimension? The answer to these questions leads to some heavy-duty mathematics. Even the Riemann Hypothesis appears.

Thursday, September 4, 2014
This talk is aimed in particular at undergraduate and graduate students.
Dan Silver, University of South Alabama Dimer Coverings

Abstract: A dimer covering (also called a perfect matching) of a graph is a collection of edges that covers each vertex exactly once. The term “dimer” comes from chemistry: a dimer is a polymer with only two atoms. If we think of vertices as univalent atoms, then dimer coverings provide simple models for studying certain phase transitions. We explain how dimer coverings arise in both topology and algebraic dynamical systems.


Talks from past years

 

 


Last modified on Wednesday, 20-Aug-2014 11:38:13 CDT

Department of Mathematics and Statistics
ILB 325
University of South Alabama
411 University Blvd North
Mobile, AL 36688-0002
phone: (251) 460-6264 (voice), (251) 460-7969 (fax)
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http://www.southalabama.edu/mathstat/colloquia/index.shtml

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