Visual Arts Advising Guide

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The Visual Arts Department

What are the Visual Arts?

The goals of the Department of Visual Arts include preparing students for careers in the visual arts or continued study at the graduate level - with concentrations in Art History, Ceramics, Graphic Design, Painting, Photography, Sculpture, Glass, Printmaking and Animation. The Visual Arts Department provides innovative and intellectually stimulating courses for persons who want to study or practice the arts for their own personal development and cultural enrichment, and introduces students to a variety of cultural traditions.

▼   Animation

The goal of this concentration is to produce graduates that will become successful professional artists in the field of animation. Emphasis is on the education of the artist in the use of animation as a medium, which involves the study of the core fundamentals of animation and cinematic time base narrative, as well as the study of the history of animation and visual effects. The program also emphasizes the training of the artist to work successfully in the animation and media arts industry. This involves training in the use of current tools and media production procedures. The program also builds character traits that are valued in the workplace—the collaborative spirit, problem solving skills, good communication skills, and professional ethics.

The students have the tactile experience of creating animation in this program, as well as experiences in fully digital two and three dimensional design software. The students use hands-on, tactile manipulation of organic, analog, non-digital media, as well as the very latest in animation software. This method represents the hybrid, eclectic, innovative, and dynamic approach at the core of the art of animation. The animation program gives the students a strong foundation as a generalist in terms of the skill sets utilized for production in the animation industry. At the senior level, students choose and are supported in their field of specialization through a thesis project. This process encourages the student’s pursuit of their personal artistic vision while simultaneously developing their professional skills.

▼   Art History
Art history is the study of art and architecture created in both the past and present by artists, architects, and craftspersons from various cultures ranging from antiquity to the contemporary world. What constitutes as art can range from traditional fine art (such as paintings and sculptures), objects in popular culture, and archaeological artifacts. Art and architecture is made for a variety of reasons from a variety of different materials; it can be a reflection of the artist’s life, a culture’s religious beliefs, or a source of political propaganda. The art historian seeks to interpret and understand art and architecture by using a variety of different methods including learning about artists' lives, and attempting to understand the societies in which the art was produced. In addition to learning the social, historical, cultural, and aesthetic significance of the visual arts, students in Art History acquire a knowledge of critical analysis, interpretive skills, research, communication, and creativity. Majoring in Art History can provide a sound preparation for jobs in traditional art historical fields such as museums, galleries, and auction houses. In addition, it also provides an advantage for entry into a variety of professional fields such as law, medicine, and business, especially given the increasing demand by professional schools that applicants have a broad intellectual background.
▼   Ceramics

The Ceramics Program in the Department of Visual Arts is designed to address the broad range of techniques and contexts the medium affords ranging from traditional to contemporary approaches to both vessel making and sculptural form. Introductory to intermediate level courses are therefore rather structured. Studio projects combine specific objectives toward learning technical craft, while promoting a creative or individualized resolution to each. Students who choose to pursue Ceramics as a primary or secondary concentration through upper level courses are challenged to put into practice the technical and aesthetic issues addressed in previous semesters toward developing an individual vision and voice.

The Ceramics lab is a well-equipped facility with ample space to accommodate program needs, including:

  • 6 large work tables (approx. 30” x 72”)
  • 3 canvas covered wedging tables
  • 17 electric potters wheels (including two that are wheel chair accessible)
  • A fully supplied glaze room with most of the common minerals and colorants.
  • A kiln room containing two electric kilns, a 28cu. ft. downdraft gas car-kiln, and
  • equipment for mixing and processing clay bodies.
  • A separate shared studio space for advanced-level students and Adjunct Faculty.
  • An outside courtyard area for pit and Raku firing.

Our program also has routine opportunities for pursuing the atmospheric firing techniques of soda, salt, and wood-fire with local/regional artists and institutions.

▼   Glass

Enrollment in the Glass Program at the University of South Alabama, which is at the forefront of glass education, is a rare opportunity for students at a Southern public university. This is the only program of its kind in the state, and the only one at a public institution in the Southeast. Courses are offered in the state of the art "hot" studio for Glass-blowing, and the "cold" studio for kiln working in "warm" thermo-forming procedures that include fusing and sculptural glass casting. "Cold" work instruction includes the shaping of glass by grinding and polishing, including lathe work, engraving, and sandblasting. The development of conceptual contemporary ideas in multi-discipline endeavors are encouraged and served by a variety of glass techniques including the use of imagery or text produced by painting, printing, drawing, and photography.

Art students as well as majors from other disciplines contribute to the glass making community experience where hot glass is gathered from two 500 pound furnaces while students learn a methodology more than 5,000 years old. Traditional or nontraditional vessel making, and the pursuit of sculptural form, is informed by contemporary and historical glass studies.

▼   Graphic Design

The Graphic Design concentration equips students with the critical and problem solving skills needed to produce work in a diverse range of areas, including branding, web design, and traditional print design. Our students explore current design practices as well as historical and contemporary influences that have and continue to shape the face of advertising and visual communication. The program provides a technical foundation for further individual exploration in regards to the media being used in the professional world. Students who graduate from our program work in a variety of design positions, such as print design, web design, advertising, marketing, illustration, and publication design. Students are expected to demonstrate an understanding of design principles and proficiency in the Adobe® Creative Suite. Our faculty encourages students to tackle design problems with unique and creative solutions. Our program builds designers that, upon graduation, are able to thrive and succeed in the field.

▼   Painting

The Painting program at the University of South Alabama prepares students for future careers in painting and drawing through a rigorous curriculum of courses designed to build skills and develop understanding of important concepts in the field. Painting courses focus on the techniques and mechanics of oil paint and the study of color. Classes are structured in a traditional manner, centered around working from life. Students also develop their own subjects and conceptual approaches through independent work. Students are expected to demonstrate a high level of drawing and painting skill along with an ability to communicate their conceptual abilities clearly. Students graduating with a BFA in Painting can pursue careers in mural painting, commission artwork, portraiture, illustration, and gallery exhibitions. Students can also pursue a Masters of Fine Arts Degree in Painting after graduation.

▼   Photography

The photography program at USA encourages growth of independent artists through experimentation, exploration, and innovation in relation to the photographic process. Students are exposed to a wide range of photographic processes such as black and white, color, historical and alternative processes, bookmaking, and digital photography.

Photographic techniques taught include studio lighting, a variety of film and digital camera formats, professional presentation of artwork, editing programs, scanning, darkroom and inkjet printing. While learning the technical aspects of photography, students are taught to conceptualize the imagery they are creating and are given the freedom to explore the various processes to aid their imagery.

▼   Sculpture

The sculpture program at USA offers an exciting and diverse choice of approaches toward working three-dimensionally. Facilities, equipment, and instruction are available in woodworking, mold making, resin casting, metal fabrication, stone carving, ceramics, and glass, as well as mixed media approaches. Students are encouraged to gain a foundation in all media and to specialize as they progress through the program.

 

Career Opportunities

The goal for the of the Department of Visual Arts is to provide a strong foundation of both technical and aesthetic skills that will allow our students to be successful as independent studio artists, or to be highly competitive in pursuing acceptance to the graduate program of their choice. However, the same basic skills of design, craftsmanship, and creative problem solving have applications in a wide variety of job opportunities.

▼   Art Historians
  • Antiquarian Book Trade
  • Artist Representative
  • Estate and Art Appraiser
  • Preservation and Conservation
  • Antiques Dealer
  • Art Law
  • Freelance Collection Manager
  • Publishing
  • Architectural Conservation
  • Art Librarian
  • Freelance Writer
  • Teaching
  • Art Advisor
  • Arts Organization Consultant
  • Governmental Agencies
  • Visual Resource Curator
▼   Ceramists
  • Studio technician
  • Glaze technician
  • Mold maker
  • Prototype designer
  • Special events production
▼   Glass Artists
  • Studio artist
  • Management of a glassblowing studio
  • Art center teaching and demonstrations
  • Assistant for professional artists
  • Production glass blowing
  • Designer and maker of architectural glass installations
  • Designer and maker of public art
  • Community involvement in the arts 
▼   Graphic Designers
  • Print Designer
  • Packaging Designer
  • Web Designer
  • UX/UI Designer
  • Interactive Designer
  • Logo and Branding Designer
  • Publication Designer
  • Advertising Designer
  • Illustrator
  • Video Editor
  • Sports Marketing Designer
  • Marketing Collateral Designer
  • Social Media Marketing Designer
  • Environmental Graphic Designer
▼   Photographers
  • Commercial photography
  • Newspapers
  • Magazines
  • Advertising Agencies
  • Website Design Agencies
  • Studio photography
  • Portrait photography
  • Scientific photography
▼   Printmakers
  • Print artist
  • Pre-press and bindery
  • Press assistant
  • Commercial printing
  • Fine art print publishing
  • Business owner and printer
  • Print curator
  • Exhibition design
  • Conservation
  • Archivist
  • Education
  • Community Programs 

 

 

Salary Trends in the Visual Arts

Unlike more vocationally-oriented majors, such as majors in business, engineering, or the health professions, A&S majors tend to study a greater range of topics outside of their immediate major area. This greater breadth provides an interdisciplinary perspective that complements the more linear education in the student’s major area. 

As a result, A&S majors are compatible with a wide-range of career options. A large 2012 survey of employers found that 81% of employers will consider any degree, so most employers do not require a specific degree. So A&S majors typically find post-graduate employment at rates comparable to more vocationally-specific degrees, Furthermore, longitudinal studies which have followed college graduates over time have shown that Arts and Sciences graduates' rates of salary growth often exceed those of more vocationally-specific majors. For example, a 2010 longitudinal survey of college majors after graduation found that:

“Occupationally specific degrees are beneficial at the point of entry into the labor market but have the lowest growth in occupational status over time. Students earning credentials focusing on general skills, in contrast, begin in jobs with low occupational status but subsequently report the greatest growth.

Another longitudinal study concluded that:

"Employment across educational fields is almost identical for individuals aged 35-44, and beyond age 45, humanities graduates actually have higher rates of employment than those in other fields. After age 45, humanities and social science majors’ salaries overtake those of counterparts in other fields."

Finally, A&S majors have on average the highest rates of increase from starting to mid-career salary, with Math, Philosophy, International Studies, Physics, Political Science, Chemistry, and Journalism all scoring in the top 10 among all majors in rate of salary growth to mid-career.

 

How to Major in the Visual Arts

The Department of Visual Arts offers a Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Fine Arts, and the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Creative Technology and Practice degrees. These degree programs are intended for students who plan to pursue careers in Art, Design, Art History or related fields, such as art education or art therapy. The Department offers minors in Studio Art and in Art History. Please visit the Bulletin for additional degree information. 

▼   Bachelor of Arts with a Concentration in Art History

The B.A. program requires completion of the general education requirements in the College of Arts and Sciences, requirements for a minor, and enough elective courses for credit hours to total 120. At least 32 hours of courses numbered 300 or higher must be taken at this University, including a minimum of 15 hours of upper-division art courses. Two courses must be designated writing credit (W) courses, at least one of which is in the art program. A minimum of 39 hours in art history and studio courses is required. All students must complete general education requirements, the core requirements, and those listed under the art history concentration.

Core Courses: 15 hours 

  • Art History I - ARH 103
  • Art History II - ARH 123
  • Contemporary Art - ARH 344 
  • Two-Dimensional Design - ARS 123
  • Three-Dimensional Design - ARS 124

Art History Courses: 24 hours 
In addition to the core requirements, 24 hours in art history courses including ARH 492 Seminar, ARH 493 Methodology of Art History, and at least one 300 or 400 level course in each of the following areas:

  • Ancient Art - ARH 304, ARH 306
  • Medieval Art - ARH 312, ARH 415
  • Renaissance Art and Baroque Art - ARH 322, ARH 324, ARH 326, ARH 330, ARH
    332, ARH 335, ARH 434
  • Modern Art - ARH 340, ARH 345, ARH 346

Seminar and special topics courses may be used to fulfill area requirements

Language Requirements in Art History: 12 hours
The art history concentration requires two years of university level study or equivalent proficiency in French or German. French and German are the preferred languages because they are required by most M.A. and Ph.D. programs in art history.

Possible Minors for B.A students
Museum Studies, Classics, Gender Studies, Anthropology, Psychology, History, Chemistry, Geology, Foreign Languages, English

▼   Bachelor of Arts with a Concentration in Studio Arts

The B.A. program requires completion of the general education requirements in the College of Arts and Sciences, requirements for a minor, and enough elective courses for credit hours to total 120. At least 32 hours of courses numbered 300 or higher must be taken at this University, including a minimum of 15 hours of upper-division art courses. Two courses must be designated writing credit (W) courses, at least one of which is in the art program. A minimum of 39 hours in art history and studio courses is required. All students must complete general education requirements, the core requirements, and those listed under the art studio concentration.

Core Courses: 15 hours 

  • Art History I - ARH 103
  • Art History II - ARH 123
  • Contemporary Art - ARH 344 
  • Two-Dimensional Design - ARS 123
  • Three-Dimensional Design - ARS 124

Studio Art: 24 hours
In addition to the core requirements, 24 hours in studio art courses of which at least 12 hours are at the 300 or 400 levels. Studio students must take ARS 396 Professional Practices.

Possible Minors for B.A students
Museum Studies, Classics, Gender Studies, Anthropology, Psychology, History, Chemistry, Geology, Foreign Languages, English

▼   Bachelor of Fine Arts with a Concentration in Animation, Ceramics, Glass, Painting, Photography, or Sculpture

Majors in Arts and Sciences may be completed with a minimum of 120 semester hours unless designated otherwise. At least 30 hours of course work, which represents 25% of the required 120 hours, must be at the upper division level in order to fulfill the University's residency requirement. At least 15 of the 30 upper-division hours must be in the major or concentration area. An overall grade-point-average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for graduation. In addition, a minimum GPA of 2.0 is required in the student's major or concentration area. 

A minimum of 120 hours of required and elective courses. At least 32 hours in courses numbered 300 or higher must be taken at this University, including a minimum of 12 hours in the primary concentration, and 6 hours in a secondary concentration. Two courses, including one in Studio Art, must be designated "Writing Across the Curriculum" (W) courses. Students must also complete the requirements of the general education curriculum. 

Art Core Requirement:

  • Drawing: five courses including ARS 121, ARS 122, one or two 200 level courses, and at least one 300 or higher level drawing course or ARS 326
  • Design: ARS 123 and ARS 124

Professional Practices: ARS 396

Senior Thesis or Senior Portfolio Requirements: ARS 498

Primary Studio Concentration: 
24 hours in chosen concentration studio courses

Secondary Studio Concentration:
15 hours in studio areas. Secondary concentrations are available in Ceramics, Glass, Painting, Photography, Printmaking, Sculpture and Interdisciplinary. Interdisciplinary Secondary consists of 9 credits in one area and 6 credits in any combination of the other areas.

Requirements for a Double Primary Concentration:
In lieu of a secondary concentration, students may complete a second primary concentration. This will require course work in excess of the 120 hours minimum required for the B.F.A. and may delay time to graduation. To complete a Double Primary Concentration, students must complete Primary Concentration requirements in two separate areas including Senior Thesis or Senior Portfolio where applicable.

▼   Bachelor of Fine Arts with a Concentration in Art History

Majors in Arts and Sciences may be completed with a minimum of 120 semester hours unless designated otherwise. At least 30 hours of course work, which represents 25% of the required 120 hours, must be at the upper division level in order to fulfill the University's residency requirement. At least 15 of the 30 upper-division hours must be in the major or concentration area. An overall grade-point-average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for graduation. In addition, a minimum GPA of 2.0 is required in the student's major or concentration area. 

A minimum of 120 hours of required and elective courses. At least 32 hours in courses numbered 300 or higher must be taken at this University, including a minimum of 12 hours in the primary concentration, and 6 hours in a secondary concentration. Two courses, including one in Studio Art, must be designated "Writing Across the Curriculum" (W) courses. Students must also complete the requirements of the general education curriculum. 

Art Core Requirement:

  • Drawing: five courses including ARS 121, ARS 122, one or two 200 level courses, and at least one 300 or higher level drawing course or ARS 326
  • Design: ARS 123 and ARS 124

Methodology of Art History: ARH 493

Senior Thesis: ARH 498

Art History: 
A primary concentration in Art History requires 30 hours in Art History, to include ARH 492 or ARH 480, ARH 408, and at least one course in each of the following areas:

  • Ancient Art - ARH 304, ARH 306.
  • Medieval Art - ARH 312, ARH 415
  • Renaissance Art and Baroque Art - ARH 322, ARH 324, ARH 326, ARH 330, ARH 332, ARH 434.
  • Modern Art - ARH 340, ARH 345, ARH 346. 

ARH 290 Special Topics, ARH 390, Special Topics, and ARH 492 Seminar, may be used to satisfy area requirements.

Secondary Studio Concentration:
Fifteen hours in studio areas. Secondary concentrations are available in Ceramics, Glass, Painting, Photography, Printmaking, Sculpture and Interdisciplinary. Interdisciplinary Secondary consists of 9 credits in one area and 6 credits in any combination of the other areas.

Requirements for a Double Primary Concentration:
In lieu of a secondary concentration, students may complete a second primary concentration. This will require course work in excess of the 120 hours minimum required for the B.F.A. and may delay time to graduation. To complete a Double Primary Concentration, students must complete Primary Concentration requirements in two separate areas including Senior Thesis or Senior Portfolio where applicable.

▼   Bachelor of Fine Arts with a Concentration in Graphic Design

Majors in Arts and Sciences may be completed with a minimum of 120 semester hours unless designated otherwise. At least 30 hours of course work, which represents 25% of the required 120 hours, must be at the upper division level in order to fulfill the University's residency requirement. At least 15 of the 30 upper-division hours must be in the major or concentration area. An overall grade-point-average (GPA) of 2.0 is required for graduation. In addition, a minimum GPA of 2.0 is required in the student's major or concentration area. 

A minimum of 120 hours of required and elective courses. At least 32 hours in courses numbered 300 or higher must be taken at this University, including a minimum of 12 hours in the primary concentration, and 6 hours in a secondary concentration. Two courses, including one in Studio Art, must be designated "Writing Across the Curriculum" (W) courses. Students must also complete the requirements of the general education curriculum. 

Art Core Requirement:

  • Drawing: five courses including ARS 121, ARS 122, one or two 200 level courses, and at least one 300 or higher level drawing course or ARS 326
  • Design: ARS 123 and ARS 124

Business Practices for Graphic Design: ARS 479

Senior Thesis or Senior Portfolio Requirements: ARS 488

Graphic Design: 

  • ARS 271
  • ARS 272
  • ARS 273
  • ARS 373
  • ARS 374
  • ARS 472
  • ARS 473
  • ARS 479
  • ARS 488
  • Two of the following: ARS 375, ARS 376, ARS 490, ARS 496

Secondary Studio Concentration:
15 hours in studio areas. Secondary concentrations are available in Ceramics, Glass, Painting, Photography, Printmaking, Sculpture and Interdisciplinary. Interdisciplinary Secondary consists of 9 credits in one area and 6 credits in any combination of the other areas.

Requirements for a Double Primary Concentration:
In lieu of a secondary concentration, students may complete a second primary concentration. This will require course work in excess of the 120 hours minimum required for the B.F.A. and may delay time to graduation. To complete a Double Primary Concentration, students must complete Primary Concentration requirements in two separate areas including Senior Thesis or Senior Portfolio where applicable.

 

Graphic Design Admissions Process:
Students who wish to pursue a degree in graphic design at the University of South Alabama may apply for admission to the BFA program in graphic design after completing ARS 271: Introduction to Graphic Design and ARS 273: Graphic Design Applications. Acceptance into the program is determined by a review process which is coordinated each fall semester. Only those admitted to the program are allowed to enroll in upper-level graphic design courses.

Upon completion of the aforementioned courses, each student who wishes to be considered for admission to the BFA program in graphic design will assemble a portfolio of his/her work to be presented for evaluation by the Graphic Design Review Board. The portfolio should consist of ten to fifteen pieces that best display the student's abilities in the area of graphic design. A limited number of these portfolio pieces may come from other studio art areas but the emphasis should be on works that are relevant to graphic design. Portfolio pieces should reflect the student's creative and conceptual abilities, demonstrate an ability to successfully work with typography, show a strong working knowledge of graphic design software, and display the student's understanding of the basic principles of design and how best to incorporate these principles compositionally. The student's portfolio will also be evaluated in terms of presentation and craftsmanship. Students accepted into the program will be those who exhibit strong design sensibilities and have potential to excel in the upper level courses.

In conjunction with the portfolio of work, each student must submit a minimum 250 word essay outlining why they feel they should be accepted into the program and what they intend to accomplish with a graphic design degree. This essay will be submitted along with the portfolio. Attention should be given to presentation and writing quality.

Students are permitted to apply for the graphic design program only twice. Upon acceptance, the chosen students will be allowed to register for upper level graphic design classes and continue their studies toward the BFA in graphic design as outlined by the University of South Alabama Bulletin. Students must register for designated graphic design classes for the fall semester following acceptance to the program. Failure to register for classes or failure to progress through the graphic design curriculum in a timely manner will result in revocation of admission status.

 

      

Special Programs, Internships, and Directed Studies

There are a number of student organizations within the department of Visual Arts: Art History Association, Glass Club (Jaglass), Graphic Design Student Association, Photography Association, Object Association, South Paw Press - Printmaking Student Organization, Oracle Fine Arts Review, and Student Art Association.

Students can have internships at the Mobile Museum of Art, Alabama Contemporary, History Museum of Mobile, and Oakleigh House.

USA Ceramic Department hosts a yearly Bowl-A-Thon to create bowls for Art Soup, a charity event to support the services of 15 Place, Family Promise, McKemie Place, Ransom Ministries Care, and other homeless groups. The Visual Arts Department hosts a yearly Holiday Sale, where students, faculty, staff and alumni submit works of art and design for sale. The proceeds benefit the department as well as the artists. The Visual Arts Department offers a variety of art demonstrations and lectures both to the university and Mobile communities.

 

Visual Arts Highlights

The Department of Visual Arts boasts over 25,000 sq. ft. of dedicated studio space and two 60 person lecture halls in its own complex built around a central courtyard. The Department offers concentrations in ten areas and an MFA program in Creative Technologies and Practice. Among the offerings, Animation and Glass are particularly noteworthy as they are the only programs of their kind in the state. The Department also houses an exhibition space and maintains a visiting artist program through which internationally recognized artists and scholars conduct lectures, demonstrations, and workshops.

The Department of Visual Arts offers numerous Art Scholarships such as:

  • Gordon B. and Martha Kahn Endowed Scholarship
  • Freshman/ Sophomore Scholarship
  • Mary Noland Glass Art Endowed Scholarship
  • Robert Snell Art Scholarship
  • The Visual Arts Scholarship
  • Glass Art Endowed Scholarship
  • V. Gordon Moulton Memorial Scholarship in Glass Art
  • Department of Visual Arts & Pittsburgh Glass Center Collaborative Scholarship

 

Study Abroad Opportunities

The Department of Visual Arts at the University of South Alabama hosts a study abroad experience in Spain. The program is based in the medieval city of Toledo, a world heritage site, with excursions to Madrid to visit the Prado, Reina Sophia, Palacio Real, and Thyssen-Bornemisza Museums; an excursion to El Escorial to tour the palace, monastery and museum, and to Segovia to tour the Alcazar and cathedral; and a two day excursion to the cities of Granada and Cordoba visiting the Alhambra and the Mesquita. The program is guided and courses taught by USA Visual Arts professors. Up to six credit hours may be earned in studio art and/or art history courses with some work required prior to and after the trip. 

Studying abroad is an exciting and meaningful experience that will contribute to your academic and personal development.  Participating on a study abroad program can be one of the most profound decisions of your college life, and can lead to many new and interesting opportunities.  It can help develop your critical thinking skills, sense of independence, and confidence.  When you depart on your study abroad program, you will go with excitement, trepidation, and uncertainty about the world and your place in it.  When you return home, your deep connection and affection for your host culture will be overwhelming, and will only be matched by a newfound respect and appreciation for your home.

Study abroad is the opportunity for USA students to spend time in a different country while earning credit towards your degree through taking classes, interning, volunteering, and more.  There are many different types of study abroad available to you at USA. They include faculty-led programs, international exchange programs, and direct-enroll and affiliate programs. 

Students on faculty-led programs will travel as a group led by USA professors and take classes in various locations. All courses taken on these programs are USA courses and offer USA credits that will apply to your degree. International Exchange programs are partnerships with specific universities around the world with which USA has a special, reciprocal relationship. Students enroll directly at the host university, and students from the host university attend USA. USA affiliate programs allow students to enroll at a partner university or program through a third-party provider. GPA requirements vary by program.

You should think of the Study Abroad Office as a one-stop shop for information related to your study abroad experience. The Study Abroad team is excited to assist you as you navigate through the process of choosing a program, and will help you from the advising stage until you return from your program.  You can get started by coming to meet with an advisor during Walk-In Advising hours. During an advising session, you can gain general information about the many programs available, how the application process works at USA and general guidance on where to begin.

Be sure to visit the OIE Study Abroad website to begin your research.  The website contains information on how to get started, financing your program, and a comprehensive list of pre-approved study abroad programs and partners. While researching a passport or visa programs, consider the following: eligibility requirements, location, course offerings, and costs.  You should also meet with your faculty advisor for assistance in selecting a program based on courses related to your degree.

Studying abroad can be one of the highlights of your university career, giving you wonderful and challenging experiences that will allow you to grow both academically and professionally. Where will you study abroad?

 

Academic Plans

Following an academic plan will help you stay on track to graduate in four years.

To access a sample academic plan for the Animation concentration, please click here.
To access a sample academic plan for the BFA Art History concentration, please click here 
To access a sample academic plan for the Ceramics concentration, please click here.  
To access a sample academic plan for the Glass concentration, please click here
To access a sample academic plan for the Graphic Design concentration, please click here
To access a sample academic plan for the Painting concentration, please click here.
To access a sample academic plan for the Photography concentration, please click here
To access a sample academic plan for the Printmaking concentration, please click here.  
To access a sample academic plan for the Sculpture concentration, please click here.  

Degree plans provide only a suggested schedule; make sure to meet with your academic advisor to find the actual schedule that is right for you.

For additional degree information, visit the undergraduate bulletin. 

 

For More Information

For more information on these programs, contact the department of Visual Arts chair, Susan Fitzsimmons, at
(251) 461-1441 or sgfitzsimmons@southalabama.edu

You can find us on campus at:

Visual Arts Department
Visual Arts Building (VAB), Room 172
Mobile, AL 36688
(251) 461-1438

Department website