Chemistry Department

  • Chemistry student working with professor
  • Chemistry students working in lab
  • Chemistry student working in the lab
  • Chemistry ceremony
  • Chemistry students working in lab
  • Group picture with three chemistry students and professor
  • Lab pic
  • Students with Chemistry Faculty
  • Halloween in Chemistry
Mission Statement

The mission of the Department of Chemistry is to provide professional development for students and faculty alike in the chemical sciences with a focus on a program which makes a difference locally, regionally, nationally, and globally. The Department of Chemistry serves as an advocate and conduit for the nexus of discovery, learning, and the dissemination of knowledge of the chemical sciences among academic units and programs of the University as reflected in the excellence of teaching, research, and service of our faculty and students.

 News


Top Prof Fall 2018Congratulations to all five (5) Chemistry faculty who were recently recognized as Top Profs through the Sally Steadman Azalea Chapter of Mortar Board.  The event offers an opportunity for students to share how members of South impact their lives in a positive way through the areas of teaching, research, and service.  When looking at the number of academic units recognized, Chemistry had more faculty recognized than any other group on campus!  

Ruth Cochran, Stockroom ManagerToday we say bon voyage to Mrs. Ruth Cochran and her family, and wish them a safe trip as they move Up North. She has been an integral part of this department and is a friend to all who know her. We will all miss her.

Cover of ChemComm Journal

New paper from USA Chemistry Department featured on cover of Chemical Communications

Making good on a promise: ionic liquids with genuinely high degrees of
thermal stability by Brooks D. Rabideau,  Kevin N. West  and  James H. Davis, Jr. 

Abstract
"Thermally robust materials have been of interest since the middle of the past century for use as high temperature structural materials, lubricants, heat transfer fluids and other uses where thermal stability is necessary or desirable. More recently, ionic liquids have been described as ‘thermally robust,’ with this moniker often originating from their low volatility rather than their innate stability. As many ionic liquids have vanishingly low vapor pressures, the upper limit of their liquid state is commonly considered to be their degradation temperature, frequently reported from TGA measurements. The short duration ramps often used in TGA experiments can significantly overestimate the temperature at which significant degradation begins to occur when the compounds are held isothermal for even a few hours. Here, we review our recent work, and that of colleagues, in developing thermally robust ionic compounds, primarily perarylphosphonium and perarylsulfonium bistriflimide salts, in some of which cation stability exceeds that of the anion. We have used a combination of molecular design, synthesis, and computational modeling to understand the complex tradeoffs involving thermal stability, low melting point and other desirable physicochemical properties."

Dr. Larry Yet with his new textbook Privileged Structures in Drug Discovery on the Chemistry balcony"Congratulations to Dr. Larry Yet whose book titled, 'Privileged Structures in Drug Discovery:  Medicinal Chemistry and Synthesis' is now in print.  This is Dr. Yet's second book that has gone in print while a faculty member of the Department of Chemistry here at the University of South Alabama.  His first book, which was published just a couple of years ago, was part of the Organic Reactions series which provided a focused, scholarly, and comprehensive overview of olefin ring-closing metathesis reactions.  His latest book in many ways builds upon his first and has as a focus the use of privileged structures as viable candidates in lead optimization stages of drug discovery.  The two books highlight Dr. Yet's expertise as a synthetic organic chemistry whose focus is in the assembly and use of novel scaffolds targeting medicinally important receptors.  " - David Forbes