Colloquia

Current Talks


30 minutes before the talk refreshments will be served in MSPB 360. If the talk is on Zoom, then the link for both the virtual "refreshments" and the talk is https://southalabama.zoom.us/j/93100317764

Join us to meet the speaker and the Mathematics & Statistics Faculty here at South!

Date Speaker Talk
October 21, 2021 at 3:30 p.m. in MSPB 370 Elena Pavelescu, University of South Alabama

This talk is directed especially toward undergraduate and graduate students in mathematics or related subjects.

Maximal Linklessly Embeddable Graphs

This talk is about graphs embedded in 3-dimensional space. We study graphs which are linklessly embeddable and, in particular, graphs which are maximal with this property (maxnil graphs). Linklessly embeddable graphs can be embedded in space in such a way that no two cycles link non-trivially. We learn how to construct large maxnil graphs from smaller maxnil graphs, and we ask how many edges can a maxnil graph with N vertices have.

Here is a warm up question. A graph is maximal planar if it can be drawn in the plane without edge intersections, while the addition of any one edge obstructs this kind of drawing. How many edges can a maximal planar graph with 5 vertices have? 6 vertices? 7 vertices? Can you find a pattern?

This talk is based on joint work with Ramin Naimi and Andrei Pavelescu. 

October 28, 2021 at 3:30 p.m. in MSPB 370 Michael DiPasquale, University of South Alabama

This talk is directed especially toward undergraduate and graduate students in mathematics or related subjects.

Cutting Up a Pizza and Related Topics

Suppose you are cutting up a pizza and you are trying to maximize the number of pieces of pizza you can get with only straight-line cuts. Can you find a formula for this maximum number just in terms of the number of cuts? What if you can only use straight-line cuts and you are trying to maximize the number of pieces of pizza that don't have any crust? What if you are super lucky and have to answer the same questions for a three-dimensional pizza - maybe a large calzone? These are some of the questions you might start with if you are studying a mathematical object called a hyperplane arrangement. It turns out that hyperplane arrangements are not only useful for cutting up pizza, but also for motion planning, studying singularities, and lots of other things! We'll start with the pizza question and see how far we get.

November 4, 2021 at 3:30 p.m. in MSPB 370 Thomas Mattman, California State University at Chico

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November 11, 2021 at 3:30 p.m. on Zoom Henry Segerman, Oklahoma State University

Artistic Mathematics: Truth and Beauty

I'll talk about my work in mathematical visualization: making accurate, effective, and beautiful pictures, models, and experiences of mathematical concepts. I'll discuss what it is that makes a visualization compelling, and show many examples in the medium of 3D printing, as well as some work in virtual reality and spherical video. I'll also discuss my experiences in teaching a project-based class on 3D printing for mathematics students.

November 18, 2021 at 3:30 p.m. in MSPB 370 Miriam Kuzbary, Georgia Institute of Technology

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Previous Talks

Date Speaker Talk
September 30, 2021 Christine Lee, University of South Alabama

This talk is directed especially toward undergraduate and graduate students in mathematics or related subjects.

The Shape of the Universe

Topology studies the shapes of objects that are unchanged by stretching and shifting. In low-dimensional topology, we study the shapes of 3- and 4-dimensional objects that model the physical world that we live in. In this talk, I will consider the question: "What is the shape of the universe?" I will introduce the mathematical context for manifolds, knots, and surfaces for making sense of the question, discuss how geometric topology helps explore the range of possibilities, and relate current physical evidence supporting the likelihood of different answers.

September 23, 2021 Joanna Furno, University of South Alabama

This talk is directed especially toward undergraduate and graduate students in mathematics or related subjects.

Rabbits and Airplanes and Dust, Oh My!

Join me on a tour of the famous Mandelbrot set! See functions that eat their own outputs. Chase complex numbers through these functions and figure out how far they need to go to escape. Color by number to reveal pictures of monstrous beasts or cute rabbits. Fall down rabbit holes of self-symmetry. By the end, will you be brave enough to tackle new, unexplored realms beyond the Mandelbrot set?

September 16, 2021 Nutan Mishra, University of South Alabama

Likelihood-Based Finite Sample Inference for Synthetic Data from the Pareto Model

Statistical agencies often publish microdata or synthetic data to protect confidentiality of survey respondents. This is more prevalent in case of income data. We have developed likelihood-based finite sample inferential methods for singly imputed synthetic data using plug-in sampling and posterior predictive sampling techniques under the Pareto distribution, a well-known income distribution. The estimators are constructed based on sufficient statistics and the estimation methods possess desirable properties. For example, the estimators are unbiased and confidence intervals developed are exact. An extensive simulation study has been carried out to analyze the performance of the proposed methods.

This is joint work with Sandeep Barui

September 9, 2021 Cornelius Pillen, University of South Alabama

On the Humphreys-Verma Conjecture and Donkin's Tilting Module Conjecture

In 1973 Humphreys and Verma conjecture that the principal indecomposable modules of a restricted Lie algebra can be lifted to their ambient algebraic group. In 1990 Donkin conjectured that these liftings should in fact be tilting modules for the algebraic group. Donkin linked his tilting module conjecture to a second conjecture of his on the existence and relationship between certain filtrations for modules of the algebraic group. Donkin's second conjecture would imply a positive answer to a question raised by Jantzen in 1980.

In this talk I will discuss some recent developments on these conjectures and Jantzen's question. Most of the results presented are based on joint work with Dan Nakano, Chris Bendel and Paul Sobaje. All efforts will be made to keep the exposition accessible.

Graduate students are strongly encouraged to attend.

August 26, 2021 Steven Clontz, University of South Alabama

This talk is directed especially toward undergraduate and graduate students in mathematics or related subjects.

The Mathematics of Mario

While often derided as a mindless distraction, many video games actually contain deep mathematical ideas. In this talk, the presenter will demonstrate instances of how mathematics can be used to overcome challenges found within the classic video games Super Mario RPG (Super Nintendo) and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Fall of the Foot Clan (Game Boy).

At the end of the talk, upcoming extracurricular and honors opportunities in mathematics and statistics will be discussed.

 

For colloquium talks from previous years click here