English Course Offerings

The English Department's course offerings vary by semester. We offer 100-level composition courses, 200-level introductory courses, 300-level intermediate courses, 400-level advanced courses, and 500-level graduate courses.

▼   SPRING 2022: THEMED COMPOSITION SECTIONS (100 LEVEL)

Spring 2022 Themed Composition Sections


EH 102.102 – Returning to Nature | Roddy
MWF 8:00-8:50

How does a trip to the beach sound? A picnic in the park? A hunting trip with your family? A night camping in the woods? Nature provides a respite from our hectic realities, and in this course, which coincides with the English department's ecologies programming this spring, we will focus our inquiry through an ecological lens as we ponder the role of nature in our lives and society through readings, research, and optional events. For the culminating research paper, students might address critical problems ranging from deer wasting disease to environmental racism and animal welfare to sea-level rise.


EH 102.120 – Constructs of Identity | Arras
MWF 10:10-11:00

Identity is constructed through a personal lens as well as a social one in which we both assign ourselves and are ascribed an identity (based on gender, race, religion, etc.). We will examine the ways we construct identity and the often invisible social/cultural forces that shape who we are. All too often, we are passive recipients of the social forces at play in the world--as if we're simply breathing in the air without ever even realizing what we are breathing in and how that breath both consumes and shapes us. This course will welcome the messy, complex, uncomfortable conversations about race, gender, etc., so that we can render these invisible forces visible and, ultimately, learn more about ourselves--our identities--and each other.


EH 102.132 – Returning to Nature | Roddy
MWF 11:15-12:05

How does a trip to the beach sound? A picnic in the park? A hunting trip with your family? A night camping in the woods? Nature provides a respite from our hectic realities, and in this course, which coincides with the English department's ecologies programming this spring, we will focus our inquiry through an ecological lens as we ponder the role of nature in our lives and society through readings, research, and optional events. For the culminating research paper, students might address critical problems ranging from deer wasting disease to environmental racism and animal welfare to sea-level rise.


EH 102.149 – Be the Change | Peterson
TR 2:00-3:15

Have you ever wondered if one person can make a difference in the problems of this world? Margaret Mead said, "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world.  Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has."   In this composition class, we will explore the issues you are passionate about, and discuss and write about ways we can make a difference.  We will also discuss our moral obligation to "Be the change you wish to see in the world," (attributed to Gandhi).


EH 102.158 – Writing about Film, Television, and New Media | Rands
TR 9:30-10:45

This themed section of 102 will focus on analyzing and constructing arguments about visual media. This course will challenge students to approach texts they might already consume regularly (such as films, television shows, YouTube videos, and more) with a critical eye. The course will consist of assignments (such as a rhetorical analysis of a music video and critical evaluation of a film) to build toward a researched argument centering around visual media. The course will benefit students who intend to study film, communication, creative writing, literature, or anyone who simply has an interest in learning more about visual texts. 


EH 102.502 – Monsters Both Real and Imagined | Davis
TR 6:00-7:15

Everyone has real monsters that they need to defeat. Often those monsters manifest themselves in some way in an artist's creation. We will be exploring literature, film, and music that create fictional monsters as symbols for real world monsters. Using the media, we will look underneath the bed and into the darkest closets of our culture, society, and systems and look the monstrous issues in the face in order to better understand and argue about those real-world issues.


▼   SPRING 2022: THEMED LITERATURE SURVEYS (200 LEVEL)

Spring 2022 Themed Literature Surveys


EH 215.108 – British Lit before 1785 | Hillyer
Patterns of Virtue and Vice
MWF 12:20-1:10

We will study representative works of British literature produced before 1785, or dating across about a thousand years, and including masterpieces by some of the greatest writers of any time or place: Geoffrey Chaucer, Edmund Spenser, William Shakespeare, and John Milton.  More particularly, we will focus on patterns of virtue and vice, as traced on both a larger and smaller scale: across dramatically changing historical conditions, but also within particular individuals presented as exemplary.  We will also examine some ambiguous cases: embodiments of virtue and (or) vice.


EH 216.102 – British Lit after 1785 Harrington
Doubles and Imposters
TR 9:30-10:45

Interested in the idea of a monstrous double — or individuals who are not what they seem to be? This Survey of British Literature after 1785 considers interesting pairings from the horrific to the humorous in British literature from the Romantic period to the present. We will use these doubles and imposters to investigate race and gender, nation and empire, guilt and innocence, and memory and identity in a sampling of texts ranging from Frankenstein to Monty Python and beyond.


EH 216.104 – British Lit after 1785 | Frye
Mad Scientists and Their Creations
MWF 11:15-12:05

This section of EH 216 will focus on how British literature after 1785 addresses the implications of scientific experimentation. We will examine how authors from the Romantic to the current era depict scientists, scientific exploration, and the results of that exploration.  This class will focus on discussions of how these authors provide insight into the ways vast changes in our understanding of the world around us can directly impact our sense of self, our view of our place in the world, and even the ethical and moral standards we live by. Although scientific experimentation in literature will be the focal point of the class, we will also look at how science becomes inextricably tied to all parts of our world, including gender, race, class, empire, and religion.


EH 225.104 – American Lit before 1865 | McLaughlin
American Fanatics, Heretics, and Rebels
MWF 2:30-3:20

The story we tell ourselves about our Puritan forbears is one in which a courageous band of faithful Christians create a "city upon a hill" as a beacon of religious tolerance and good will. But, in fact, from the 17th century's three "crime waves"--the Antinomian Controversy, the Quaker Persecutions, and the Salem Witch Trials--to the three Great Awakenings of the 18th and 19th centuries, religious controversy and intolerance have been the order of the day. This course examines the highs and the lows of our spotted religious history and their impact on American literature.


EH 226 – American Lit after 1865 | Owsley
Health and Medicine
226.101 MWF 11:15-12:05
226.103 MWF 9:05-9:55

When The Pixies asked "Where is My Mind?," surely they didn't intend on their listeners actually finding it. The exact message of the song is a bit allusive, precisely because the verses and the chorus seem abstract bordering on crazy. But perhaps that's the point. Who's to say that the lead singer didn't talk to fish? Who possesses the authoritative power to judge his psychological health? How does one go about such a diagnosis? These questions of physical and mental equilibrium inform our theme for this class: healthcare. In many of the texts we'll read this semester, we'll examine evolving perceptions of subjectivity in relation to the act of doctoring. Beginning with the rise of professionalized—and masculinized—medicine in the late nineteenth-century, we'll investigate how the medical power of diagnosis impacted the sexual, reproductive, psychological, physical, and emotional health of men and women throughout the post-1865 American literary landscape."


EH 235.102 – World Lit before 1650 | Peterson
Our World Commonalities
TR 12:30-1:45

Ever wonder about the common bonds we share with others in the world in history, culture, faith, and heritage?  In this class, we will explore these bonds through a study of: creation stories in Islamic, Hebrew, Greek and Roman traditions; flood narratives with Gilgamesh and Noah;  humankind's hubris with Homer, Milton, and Biblical narratives; the epics of Virgil, Homer, Beowulf, and Dante; the philosophies of Socrates, Plato, Jesus, and the Koran; the Middle Ages tales of Chaucer, Boccacio, and Everyman; poetry from Sappho to Shakespeare, and lastly the tragedies of two sons seeking divine retribution for regicide in Oedipus Rex and Hamlet. We may discover that we have more in common than not! 


EH 235 – World Lit before 1650 | Roddy
Myth and Meaning
EH 235.105 – MWF 1:25-2:15
EH 235.106 – MWF 10:10-11:00

How did the world begin? How can we understand our mortality? Are there gods or a God who orders our world? Or are we simply following a script of our own making? In this survey, we take a comparative look at seminal religious, philosophical, and literary texts to see how burgeoning civilizations around the globe explore big questions to understand humanity's place in the universe. We'll examine legends of early world literature, like Confucius, Sappho, and Vālmīki, as well as texts born out of the communal consciousness of tale-telling across the ages.


EH 236.801 – World Lit after 1650 | Peterson
Social Justice through Writing
WEB

Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote, "Not he [or she] is great who can alter matter, but he [or she] who can alter my state of mind."  How do great authors enlighten us to their way of thinking, and what genre of writing has the greatest power to do so?  We will study many genres: satires, dramas, mock epics, essays, animal fables, and novels to make our determinations as to how writing enacts change in the past and today.  Some of the impactful works we will study are:Jean de la Fontaine's animal fables, Jonathan Swifts' Gulliver's Travels and "Modest Proposal," Alexander Pope's "Rape of the Lock" and "Essay on Man,"and Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.  We will also explore modern and contemporary works with Brazilian students in a collaborative project on Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale.


▼   SPRING 2022: UNDERGRAD ENGLISH COURSES (300 and 400 LEVEL)

Spring 2022 Undergraduate Courses


EH 300.101 – Intro to Literary Study | Cesarini
MWF 12:20-1:10

What makes a work of literature work? How to address this question, and how to develop our understandings of literature in writing, will be the focus of the course. We will study fundamental and more specialized literary terms and concepts, and a range of literary genres, periods, and cultures, as these all matter to how we read. We will also survey several of the most influential theories of literary study. Students will make one presentation in class, and they will write three essays.


EH 332.101 – American Nonfiction Prose | Cesarini
MWF 2:30-3:20

This is a survey of American writers of nonfiction prose before 1900, such as John Bartram, Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Mark Twain. We will consider how Nature became a new literary and theoretical subject in the hands of the Transcendentalists, and how Nature was again re-conceptualized in the latter half of the 19th century under the influence of Darwin's work. We will also consider the politics of Nature as these were manifest in discourses around Native America and preservationism. Graded work includes one presentation in class, a shorter, interpretive essay, and a longer, researched essay. (EH 332 fulfills the major requirement for a course in the 1660-1900 period. EH 332 is part of the spring ecology series.)


EH 360.101 – Anglo-American Poetry Since 1900 | Vrana
TR 2:00-3:15

W.H. Auden's statement that "poetry makes nothing happen" has become infamous. But many Anglo-American poets since 1900—including Auden!—address current events in ways that might generate some outcome. EH360 will explore how a few of the many authors we could call "Anglo-American" have written verse related to social unrest or shifts of their time. Writers featured may include canonical poets T.S. Eliot, Auden, Elizabeth Bishop, and Sylvia Plath; Black/diasporic poets Claude McKay, Gwendolyn Brooks, Linton Kwesi Johnson, and Dionne Brand; and other poets of color, like Li-Young Lee and Layli Long Soldier. Assignments to include two papers, student presentations, and an exam. Studying excerpts by such wide-ranging authors, we will address disputes about the very idea of what comprises "Anglo-American poetry" across time and place, from 1900 to the present.


EH 369.101 – Modern Short Story | Harrington
TR 12:30-1:45

This class explores the form of the short story by examining a wide variety of authors and styles of short fiction in their cultural and historical contexts, focusing on topics including, gender, sexuality, race, and ethnicity. We will start with an assortment of stories, including stories from writers at USA, then read stories from Joyce's The Dubliners (1914), O'Connor's Everything That Rises Must Converge (1965), Angela Carter's The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories (1979), García Márquez's Strange Pilgrims (1993), Lahiri's Interpreter of Maladies (1999), Evans's Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self (2010), and Munro's Dear Life (2012). We will view two well-known film adaptations of stories, Huston's The Dead and Jordan's The Company of Wolves. Students will be encouraged to examine an author's writing in a series of stories or story cycle, as well as the relationships between the various authors, styles, and issues covered in the course of the semester. 


EH 371.101 – Approaches to English Grammar (W) | Beason
11:00-12:15 TR

So what is a dangling participle anyway?  EH 371 offers students a valuable intellectual and practical skill: the ability to analyze and describe in technical terms how a given sentence is structured—beyond just saying it does or doesn't "flow."  While the course was originally developed for students planning to teach English courses at the secondary level, EH 371 is useful for just about anyone wanting to edit, write, analyze literary texts, teach non-native speakers of English, practice law, or learn more about the English language. EH 371 is also a W-course and can help fulfill that requirement for English majors and many other students.


EH 372.103 – Technical Writing (W) | Guzy
EH 372.103 MWF 9:05-9:55
EH 372.106 MWF 1:25-2:15

The purpose of this course is to train students in the kinds of written reports required of practicing professionals, aiming to improve mastery of the whole process of report writing from conceptual stage through editing stage. This course will introduce you to types of written and oral communication used in workplace settings, with a focus on technical reporting and editing. Through several document cycles, you will develop skills in managing the organization, development, style, and visual format of various documents. 


EH 372.801 – Technical Writing (W) | Amare
WEB

This course is designed to help students

  • Understand and analyze writing situations and technologies
  • Invoke the roles and strategies necessary to produce effective writing in localized and globalized contexts
  • Improve their understanding of how writing practices and genres (memos, email, proposals, reports, and websites) function within and across organizations 
  • Determine how various readers read, where readers or users look for information, and what multiple purposes documents serve inside and outside particular organizations 
  • Produce more effective visual, textual, and multimedia documents

EH 380.101 – Science Fiction | Hollingsworth
TR 11:00-12:15

We will approach science fiction in and as experience: as a way of thinking and feeling the actual and imagined possibilities and consequences of scientific and technical power. In addition to classics by Mary Shelley and H. G. Wells, we will read narratives by writers such as Octavia Butler and Michael Crichton, and view several highly influential sf films.


EH 390.103 – Special Topics: The Hero's Journey | Guzy
MWF 11:15-12:05

In this course, we will study the Hero's Journey in its various iterations around the world.  We will explore cultural and generational commonalities among ancient and modern religions, philosophies, mythologies, and fairy tales, demonstrating how they build a universal foundation for the journey to adulthood and/or enlightenment.  Selected canonical and contemporary texts will help us to delineate the chronological development of a western tradition of road trip and coming-of-age stories.


EH 391.101 – Fiction Writing | Griffin
TR 9:30-10:45

This course will introduce students to the art of short fiction and its contemporary practitioners. We will read short fiction not so much for "meaning" or "theme" but for technique. We're interested in how stories are built in order to gain insight into how we might build them ourselves. A popular myth is that good writing is built on inspiration and "natural talent," but the very existence of this course implies otherwise. And nearly every accomplished fiction writer will tell you that his or her success is owing mostly to studied technique, careful reading, and a whole lot of experimentation.


EH 402.101 – Rhetoric: Ancient and Modern (W) | Amare
MWF 12:20-1:10

This course is designed for individuals who want a better understanding of the history of rhetoric, particularly rhetoric in the Western World. Rhetoric is often a controversial topic at best, and it is helpful to trace why rhetoric is sometimes given a bad rap in our modern day. We will study the fundamentals of rhetoric, beginning with the Greeks. After examining and discussing characteristics, subject matter, and topoi of Classical Rhetoric, we will move swiftly through Medieval, Renaissance, and Enlightenment Rhetoric before grounding ourselves more firmly in the rhetorical traditions of more recent historical time periods. This method will allow us adequate sampling and understanding of basic rhetorical moves and their conditions that will help us better consume, critique, and produce effective modern and postmodern rhetoric. 


EH 461.101 – Tudor and Stuart Drama | Hillyer
MWF 1:25-2:15

We will be studying some of the most brilliant plays produced for the English stage by Shakespeare's contemporaries.  These include masterpieces by Ben Jonson, Christopher Marlowe, and the playwriting team of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher.  But these also include examples by various hands of work in the genre of "Domestic Plays," such as A Woman Killed with Kindness and The Tragedy of Master Arden of Faversham.  The main assignment will be a research paper developed in stages.


EH 478.501 – Studies in Film: Adaptation | McLaughlin
MW 5:00-6:15; M 6:30-9:00

The aim of this class on adaptation is to get acquainted with our "I" by getting acquainted with our eye. What this will entail is an effort to 1) think more reflectively about how and why we see what we see, 2) understand how sight manipulates and is manipulated by the world in which it operates, and 3) develop a critical and self-aware eye. To aid in this effort, we will watch films and read the novellas, novels, and short stories upon which they have been based. The two central and interrelated questions that we will address are how and why screenplay writers and film directors deviate from or align themselves with the original texts in the ways that they do. 


EH 481.101 – Comp and Rhetoric (W) | Beason
"Analyzing Our Worlds"
TR 2:00-3:15

Been feeling programmed, controlled, and indoctrinated?  Our world is full of persuasive messages--even when the author is not fully aware s/he is sending anything other than "objective information."  Should we not realize what these messages are—and determine if they are manipulative, benign, or 'good'?  This course will draw on specific approaches that analyze texts and put rhetorical theory into practice.  This course helps students understand the varied persuasion that affects our personal lives and social ecologies.  The course provides a "theoretical toolkit" so we can understand major types of rhetorical criticism and then evaluate hidden, as well as overt, forms of persuasion that surround us in everyday life.  This course is part of the spring ecology series.


EH 483-501 – Advanced Fiction Writing | Griffin
T 6:00-8:30

This is a workshop-based course for intermediate and advanced writers of fiction. We will read closely from a wide variety of short fiction, and we will draft our own stories to be critiqued by our classmates. Additionally, we will study craft essays about the genre with an eye toward exploring its history. Discussions will address aspects of craft as well as the cultural lineage of contemporary short fiction. When appropriate, conferences and independent projects will focus on literary journals and the submission process.


EH 485.501 – Advanced Poetry Writing | Pence
TR 11:00-12:15

Whereas EH 395 focuses on poetic forms, this class focuses on styles that currently define American poetry. We will explore political, narrative, surreal and other approaches from the best poets writing today. In fact, we will feature a contemporary poet every other week (with at least three Zoom visits) and read that poet's latest book. The featured poet will provide a prompt, which will begin our poems that we submit for workshop the following week. In so doing, the class will examine the state of the contemporary lyric from a variety of styles, viewpoints, and techniques.  Note: Part of the spring ecology series.


EH 490.102 – Special Topic: Ecology and Narrative | Halbrooks
MWF 1:25-2:15

This course is part of the English Department's spring-semester series on ecology. We will study a range of English narratives, primarily from the nineteenth century, from an ecological perspective. We typically think of novels and narrative poems as character-driven, but we will readjust our interpretive lenses to focus on the spaces, landscapes, and seascapes through which characters move, and we will consider the effects of scientific discoveries and industrialization on the narrative ecologies of these texts. We will be reading novels and poems by Emily Brontë, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, William Wordsworth, Charlotte Smith, and Mary Robinson.


EH 492.101 – Seminar: Folklore | Jackson
TR 12:30-1:45

This course focuses on the collection of folklore and expressive culture. Analysis of oral narrative provides a contemporary glimpse at collective memory in a specific time and place. Students are trained in ethnographic fieldwork methods, oral history interviewing techniques, transcription, and the evaluation of oral evidence. The class reads theoretical material about collective memory, the relationship between memory and folklore, the ethnographer's role in the creation or preservation of the past, and the challenges and possibilities of interpreting genres and contexts of folkloric performance.


EH 497.101 – Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing | Tucker, Gaillard
TR 2:00-3:15

At a time when creative nonfiction is most often construed as personal narrative or memoir, Pulitzer Prize winner Cynthia Tucker and South Alabama Writer in Residence Frye Gaillard offer a dive into the literature of narrative nonfiction. "Our assumption," says Gaillard, "is that telling someone else's story requires at least as much creative skill as telling your own." Students will consider such books as John Hersey's reportorial masterpiece, Hiroshima, as well as shorter essays and articles. The course offers both graduate and undergraduate credit. 


▼   SPRING 2022: GRAD ENGLISH COURSES (500 LEVEL)

Spring 2022 Graduate Courses


EH 501.501 – Introduction to Critical Theory | Vrana
T 6:00-8:30

What is theory, and is it indeed "critical" for a 21st-century scholar and teacher of literature? EH501 provides an introduction to some of the most essential debates within and approaches to critical theory and literary criticism, as they have evolved from the early 20th century through the present. We will read excerpts by important theorists grouped topically, covering the basics of such schools of thought as Structuralism, New Historicism, New Criticism, feminist theory/gender studies, critical race theory, and ecocriticism. In particular, we will focus on how one might effectively bring such wide-ranging lenses to African American literature. But students will regardless of literary interests develop facility at and comfort with engaging different types of "theory" going forward, through activities to include discussion, written responses, presentations, and two papers.


EH 507.101 – Topics in Rhetoric/Composition | Beason
"Analyzing Our Worlds"
TR 2:00-3:15

Been feeling programmed, controlled, and indoctrinated?  Our world is full of persuasive messages--even when the author is not fully aware s/he is sending anything other than "objective information."  Should we not realize what these messages are—and determine if they are manipulative, benign, or 'good'?  This course will draw on specific approaches that analyze texts and put rhetorical theory into practice.  This course helps students understand the varied persuasion that affects our personal lives and social ecologies.  The course provides a "theoretical toolkit" so we can understand major types of rhetorical criticism and then evaluate hidden, as well as overt, forms of persuasion that surround us in everyday life.  This course is part of the spring ecology series.


EH 543.501 – American Romanticism | Cesarini
R 6:00-8:30

Focusing primarily on nonfiction prose and poetry, this is a study of writers of the American Romantic Movement, such as Edgar Allan Poe, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, Walt Whitman, and Emily Dickinson. We will devote special attention to the concept of, and writing about, Nature, as many of our writers did. Why did it take on the special meanings it did in this period, and how do those meanings still matter today? Graded work includes short weekly response papers, one presentation, and write two longer essays. (EH 543 is part of the spring ecology series.)


EH 574.101 – Folklore and Ways of Listening | Jackson
TR 12:30-1:45

This course focuses on the collection of folklore and expressive culture. Analysis of oral narrative provides a contemporary glimpse at collective memory in a specific time and place. Students are trained in ethnographic fieldwork methods, oral history interviewing techniques, transcription, and the evaluation of oral evidence. The class reads theoretical material about collective memory, the relationship between memory and folklore, the ethnographer's role in the creation or preservation of the past, and the challenges and possibilities of interpreting genres and contexts of folkloric performance.


EH 577.501 – Studies in Genre: Tudor and Stuart Drama M 180-2030 | Hillyer
M 6:00-8:30

We will be studying some of the most brilliant plays produced for the English stage by Shakespeare's contemporaries.  These include masterpieces by Ben Jonson, Christopher Marlowe, and the playwriting team of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher.  But these also include examples by various hands of work in the genre of "Domestic Plays," such as A Woman Killed with Kindness and The Tragedy of Master Arden of Faversham.  The main assignment will be a research paper developed in stages.


EH 583.501 | EH 584.501 – Grad Fiction Writing Wksp I & II | Griffin
T 6:00-8:30

This is a workshop-based course for graduate writers of fiction. We will read closely from a wide variety of short fiction, and we will draft our own stories to be critiqued by our classmates. Additionally, we will study craft essays about the genre with an eye toward exploring its history. Discussions will address aspects of craft as well as the cultural lineage of contemporary short fiction. When appropriate, conferences and independent projects will focus on literary journals and the submission process.


EH 585.501 | EH 586.501 – Grad Poetry Writing Wksp I & II | Pence
W 6:00-8:30

This graduate writing course explores different styles that currently define the American contemporary poem and engages with how these styles are responses to Romantic and modern literature. We will explore political, narrative, surreal and other approaches from the best poets writing today. In fact, we will host a poet every other week (over Zoom) and read that poet's latest book. The guest will provide a prompt, which will begin our poems that we submit for workshop. In so doing, the class will examine the contemporary lyric from a variety of viewpoints and techniques. Note: Part of the spring ecology series.


EH 589.101 – Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing | Tucker, Gaillard
TR 2:00-3:15

At a time when creative nonfiction is most often construed as personal narrative or memoir, Pulitzer Prize winner Cynthia Tucker and South Alabama Writer in Residence Frye Gaillard offer a dive into the literature of narrative nonfiction. "Our assumption," says Gaillard, "is that telling someone else's story requires at least as much creative skill as telling your own." Students will consider such books as John Hersey's reportorial masterpiece, Hiroshima, as well as shorter essays and articles. The course offers both graduate and undergraduate credit. 


EH 590.102 – Special Topic: Ecology and Narrative | Halbrooks
MWF 1:25-2:15

This course is part of the English Department's spring-semester series on ecology. We will study a range of English narratives, primarily from the nineteenth century, from an ecological perspective. We typically think of novels and narrative poems as character-driven, but we will readjust our interpretive lenses to focus on the spaces, landscapes, and seascapes through which characters move, and we will consider the effects of scientific discoveries and industrialization on the narrative ecologies of these texts. We will be reading novels and poems by Emily Brontë, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, William Wordsworth, Charlotte Smith, and Mary Robinson.


EH 599: THESIS HOURS

Please see Dr. Halbrooks if you would like to register for thesis hours and have not already discussed your committee, graduation requirements, etc.


▼   SPRING SERIES 2022:  ECOLOGY

Spring Series 2022: Ecology


Are you interested in ecology in relation to literature, creative writing, and rhetoric? You can opt for one or more of our spring English classes to explore this area further. We will also host a series of lectures and events on ecology in the spring.


Undergraduate Ecology-Themed English Courses


EH 332.101 – American Nonfiction Prose | Cesarini
MWF 2:30-3:20

This is a survey of American writers of nonfiction prose before 1900, such as John Bartram, Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Mark Twain. We will consider how Nature became a new literary and theoretical subject in the hands of the Transcendentalists, and how Nature was again re-conceptualized in the latter half of the 19th century under the influence of Darwin's work. We will also consider the politics of Nature as these were manifest in discourses around Native America and preservationism. Graded work includes one presentation in class, a shorter, interpretive essay, and a longer, researched essay. (EH 332 fulfills the major requirement for a course in the 1660-1900 period. EH 332 is part of the spring ecology series.)


EH 481.101 Comp and Rhetoric:  Analyzing Our Worlds (W) | Beason
TR 2:00-3:15

Been feeling programmed, controlled, and indoctrinated?  Our world is full of persuasive messages--even when the author is not fully aware s/he is sending anything other than "objective information."  Should we not realize what these messages are—and determine if they are manipulative, benign, or 'good'?  This course will draw on specific approaches that analyze texts and put rhetorical theory into practice.  This course helps students understand the varied persuasion that affects our personal lives and social ecologies.  The course provides a "theoretical toolkit" so we can understand major types of rhetorical criticism and then evaluate hidden, as well as overt, forms of persuasion that surround us in everyday life.  This course is part of the spring ecology series.


EH 485.501 – Advanced Poetry Writing | Pence
TR 11:00-12:15

Whereas EH 395 focuses on poetic forms, this class focuses on styles that currently define American poetry. We will explore political, narrative, surreal and other approaches from the best poets writing today. In fact, we will feature a contemporary poet every other week (with at least three Zoom visits) and read that poet's latest book. The featured poet will provide a prompt, which will begin our poems that we submit for workshop the following week. In so doing, the class will examine the state of the contemporary lyric from a variety of styles, viewpoints, and techniques.  Note: Part of the spring ecology series.


EH 490.102 – Special Topic: Ecology and Narrative | Halbrooks
MWF 1:25-2:15

This course is part of the English Department's spring-semester series on ecology. We will study a range of English narratives, primarily from the nineteenth century, from an ecological perspective. We typically think of novels and narrative poems as character-driven, but we will readjust our interpretive lenses to focus on the spaces, landscapes, and seascapes through which characters move, and we will consider the effects of scientific discoveries and industrialization on the narrative ecologies of these texts. We will be reading novels and poems by Emily Brontë, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, William Wordsworth, Charlotte Smith, and Mary Robinson.


Graduate Ecology-Themed English Courses


EH 507.101 Topics in Rhetoric/Composition: Analyzing Our Worlds | Beason
TR 2:00-3:15

Been feeling programmed, controlled, and indoctrinated?  Our world is full of persuasive messages--even when the author is not fully aware s/he is sending anything other than "objective information."  Should we not realize what these messages are—and determine if they are manipulative, benign, or 'good'?  This course will draw on specific approaches that analyze texts and put rhetorical theory into practice.  This course helps students understand the varied persuasion that affects our personal lives and social ecologies.  The course provides a "theoretical toolkit" so we can understand major types of rhetorical criticism and then evaluate hidden, as well as overt, forms of persuasion that surround us in everyday life.  This course is part of the spring ecology series.


EH 543.501 – American Romanticism | Cesarini
R 6:00-8:30

Focusing primarily on nonfiction prose and poetry, this is a study of writers of the American Romantic Movement, such as Edgar Allan Poe, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, Walt Whitman, and Emily Dickinson. We will devote special attention to the concept of, and writing about, Nature, as many of our writers did. Why did it take on the special meanings it did in this period, and how do those meanings still matter today? Graded work includes short weekly response papers, one presentation, and write two longer essays. (EH 543 is part of the spring ecology series.)


EH 585.501 EH 586.501 – Grad Poetry Writing Wksp I & II | Pence
W 6:00-8:30

This graduate writing course explores different styles that currently define the American contemporary poem and engages with how these styles are responses to Romantic and modern literature. We will explore political, narrative, surreal and other approaches from the best poets writing today. In fact, we will host a poet every other week (over Zoom) and read that poet's latest book. The guest will provide a prompt, which will begin our poems that we submit for workshop. In so doing, the class will examine the contemporary lyric from a variety of viewpoints and techniques. Note: Part of the spring ecology series.


EH 590.102 – Special Topic: Ecology and Narrative | Halbrooks
MWF 1:25-2:15

This course is part of the English Department's spring-semester series on ecology. We will study a range of English narratives, primarily from the nineteenth century, from an ecological perspective. We typically think of novels and narrative poems as character-driven, but we will readjust our interpretive lenses to focus on the spaces, landscapes, and seascapes through which characters move, and we will consider the effects of scientific discoveries and industrialization on the narrative ecologies of these texts. We will be reading novels and poems by Emily Brontë, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, William Wordsworth, Charlotte Smith, and Mary Robinson.


 

A full listing of all courses in the departmental catalog is available via the University Bulletin.  For a listing of courses offered in a given semester, please visit PAWS.  Enter the catalog term you wish to search and select "English" as the subject on the page that follows.