English Course Offerings

The English Department's course offerings vary by semester. We offer 100-level composition courses, 200-level introductory courses, 300-level intermediate courses, 400-level advanced courses, and 500-level graduate courses. For a listing of everything in the departmental catalog, please visit:

http://www.southalabama.edu/bulletin/current/courses/english/index.html

For a listing of courses offered in a given semester, please visit PAWS. Enter the catalog term you wish to search and select "English" as the subject on the following page.


Summer 2019 Undergraduate Course Offerings


Technical Writing - EH 372 | Morrow
MTWRF, 10:20 to 12:15

Practicing professionals of any discipline are required to do some sort of writing. That writing varies different across different audiences, contexts, and purposes. The purpose of this course is to train students in the kinds of written genres required of practicing professionals, aiming to improve mastery of the whole process of genre writing from the conceptual stage through the editing stage. At the same time, students will learn to recognize and adapt their writing to fit the various contexts, genres, and situations for which they may find themselves writing.


Story Analysis / Writing - EH 390 | Parker
MTWRF, 10:20 to 12:15

A singular focus on the contemporary American short story, including analysis of forms, characters, structure, and themes. This course also includes a heavy writing component.


Radical Austen - EH 490 | Halbrooks
MTWRF, 12:40 to 3:10

The title of the course refers to Helena Kelly's recent, provocative book, Jane Austen: Secret Radical, because we will be interrogating the book's central claim. Do Austen's novels reflect hidden radicalism or entrenched conservatism? Compelling cases can be made for either of these positions, though our conclusions will inevitably be more complex and ambivalent. We will read Austen's major novels, consider a selection of film adaptations, and study recent trends in Austenian scholarship.


Summer 2019 Graduate Course Offerings


Radical Austen - EH 590 | Halbrooks
MTWRF, 12:40 to 3:10

The title of the course refers to Helena Kelly's recent, provocative book, Jane Austen: Secret Radical, because we will be interrogating the book's central claim. Do Austen's novels reflect hidden radicalism or entrenched conservatism? Compelling cases can be made for either of these positions, though our conclusions will inevitably be more complex and ambivalent. We will read Austen's major novels, consider a selection of film adaptations, and study recent trends in Austenian scholarship.


Fall 2019 Undergraduate Course Offerings


Introduction to Literary Study - EH 300 | Vrana
MWF, 12:20 to 1:10

EH 300, required of all English majors to prepare students for 400-level courses in literature, explores the question: What, how, and why do we read in 2019? We will focus on basic methods and terminology of literary interpretation: close reading, analytical writing, and discussing complexity—skills key to a range of coursework and careers. Texts will be recent and may include: The Last Final Girl (Stephen Graham Jones), Bitter in the Mouth (Monique Truong), Citizen (Claudia Rankine), one film (like Get Out or Wolverine), and multimedia/digital work.


Shakespeare's Tragedies and Histories - EH 323 | Hillyer
TR, 2:00 to 3:15

We will be studying representative examples of Shakespeare's plays in two genres: tragedies and histories. Highlights will include the profound soul-searching of Hamlet, the volcanic rage of King Lear, the gleeful villainy of Richard III, and the comic exuberance of Sir John Falstaff. We will collectively read aloud selected passages from the plays, in part to practice detailed textual analysis, and in part to grasp key interactions among the leading characters. I will assign two short papers (3-4 pages), a midterm, and a final.


American Nonfiction Prose - EH 332 | Cesarini
TR, 11:00 to 12:15

EH 332 is a survey of major American nonfiction prose written before 1900, by such writers as Frederick Douglass, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Jane Addams, Anna Julia Cooper, Sarah Winnemucca, Black Elk, Henry Adams, William James, and Mark Twain. We will also study some theory about non-fiction and about specific nonfiction genres, and we’ll read some nonfiction since 1900 in order to trace the influences of some of our writers down to the present.


Anglo-American Poetry since 1900 - EH 360 | Hillyer
TR, 9:30 to 10:45

We will be studying selected poems by four authors: William Carlos Williams (1883-1963), T. S. Eliot (1888-1965), W. H. Auden (1907-73), and Philip Larkin (1922-85). Each of these authors will give us different perspectives on the variable meanings of "Anglo-American Poetry." I will introduce each author with an overview lecture; thereafter, we will discuss these poets' works through close readings attentive to details of form, diction, imagery, and tone. I will assign two short papers (3-4 pages), a midterm, and a final.


Contemporary Fiction - EH 366 | St. Clair
MWF, 2:30 to 3:20

Nothing essential happens in the absence of sound. In this course we’ll listen to a handful of contemporary novels and discuss the ways in which music, sound technology, and audible culture increasingly shape the literary fiction of the twenty-first century.


Approaches to English Grammar (W) - EH 371 | Amare
TR, 11:00 to 12:15

This course is designed for individuals who want a working knowledge of grammar to (1) teach it to others and (2) function within the discipline of English Studies. In addition to learning grammar and usage concepts, we will explore different approaches to teaching grammar. You will research articles about the changing role of grammar in the English Studies curriculum to help you contextualize these concepts within the larger debate of English Studies and the teaching of grammar.


Technical Writing (W) - EH 372 | Guzy
MWF, 10:10 to 11:00

The purpose of this course is to train students in the kinds of written reports required of practicing professionals, aiming to improve mastery of the whole process of report writing from conceptual stage through editing stage. This course will introduce you to types of written and oral communication used in workplace settings, with a focus on technical reporting and editing. Through several document cycles, you will develop skills in managing the organization, development, style, and visual format of various documents.


Technical Writing (W) - EH 372 | Morrow
MWF, 9:05 to 9:55

Practicing professionals of any discipline are required to do some sort of writing. That writing varies different across different audiences, contexts, and purposes. The purpose of this course is to train students in the kinds of written genres required of practicing professionals, aiming to improve mastery of the whole process of genre writing from the conceptual stage through the editing stage. At the same time, students will learn to recognize and adapt their writing to fit the various contexts, genres, and situations for which they may find themselves writing.


Writing in the Professions (W) - EH 373 | Beason
MWF, 1:25 to 2:15

What does it mean to “write on the job,” and how is it different from college writing? This W-Course is intended for students in diverse majors. It also counts as an "English elective" for most English majors and minors. The goal is to prepare you to write in one or more professions. To do so, we focus on three elements: (1) “generic” workplace-writing skills; (2) rhetorical analysis of workplaces; (3) and practice in writing and critiquing documents.


Horror - EH 379 | Guzy
MWF, 9:05 to 9:55

Do scientific, political, cultural, and technological developments alleviate our deepest fears or create new ones? In this course, we will investigate ways in which the horror genre has developed from and in turn has shaped our culture. Through active class discussion, oral presentations, and written assignments, students will analyze and critique aspects of horror and relate horror works and themes to areas of personal and professional interest. Readings will include fictional texts and scholarly commentary on the genre; selected video clips and feature-length films will also be viewed and discussed.


Fiction Writing - EH 391 | Poole
MWF, 11:15 to 12:05

This course will introduce students to the art of short fiction and its contemporary practitioners. We will read short fiction not so much for "meaning" or "theme" but for technique. We’re interested in how stories are built in order to gain insight into how we might build them ourselves. A popular myth is that good writing is built on inspiration and "natural talent," but the very existence of this course implies otherwise. And nearly every accomplished fiction writer will tell you that his or her success is owing mostly to studied technique, careful reading, and a whole lot of experimentation.


Poetry Writing - EH 391 | Pence
TR, 12:30 to 1:45

In this course, we will practice writing poems in different forms, from the intellectual slinkiness of Shakespeare’s sonnets to the cosmic embrace of Whitman’s freeverse. Our focus will not be so much on the rules regulating each form, but on the deep history, artistry, and context behind those rules so that we can choose the right form for our poem’s content. Some forms will include syllabics, spoken word, persona poems, and freeverse. How one varies these forms and tailors them to a personal aesthetic will be the challenge and pleasure.


Teaching Composition (W) - EH 401 | Beason
MWF, 11:15 to 12:05

EH 401 is primarily for English majors planning to teach writing at the secondary level (or seriously considering doing so). The course offers theoretical, practical, and hands-on experience to prepare you for teaching students to write effectively in diverse genres and situations. EH 401 also helps students fulfill the “W-Course” requirement.


Literary Criticism to 1900 (W) - EH 421 | Halbrooks
MWF, 12:20 to 1:10

This course will survey some of the major debates about literature beginning with Gorgias, Plato, and Aristotle. What is literature? What does it do, and what is its function? What is the relationship between literature and the world? How do we define and categorize literary form and genre? What is the responsibility of the writer? How can women respond to a predominantly male literary canon? How can people of color respond to a predominantly white canon? What might constitute productive strategies of literary interpretation and analysis?


Medieval Literature - EH 470 | Halbrooks
MWF, 1:25 to 2:15

This course will consider various forms of self-construction in ancient, medieval, and early modern texts. Our main focus will be the "heroic" self in medieval literature, its roots in both the ancient epic and confessional literature, and its radical reshaping in the early modern period. We will read major texts by Sir Thomas Malory, Augustine, the "Gawain Poet," and Chaucer, along with other contextual selections.


Madness in Conrad - EH 477 | Harrington
TR, 2:00 to 3:15

“Ever any madness in your family?” the doctor asks Marlow in Heart of Darkness, gesturing toward the Victorians’ fears of hereditary madness and setting up the madness of this dark tale. Unexpectedly, the fiction of Joseph Conrad features urban as well as colonial and shipboard settings and developed portrayals of women as well as introspective sailors. He draws on adventure and sensational fiction to consider the instability of narrative, race and evolution, sexuality, and women’s liberation, offering a fascinating perspective on late Victorian period while engaging the themes of modernism.


Advanced Fiction Writing - EH 483 | Prince
R, 6:00 to 8:30

This course is a seminar, writing workshop, and directed-study for intermediate and experienced writers of fiction. Through tailored writing projects that range from short stories, novellas, and novel excerpts, students will learn to utilize peer and instructor feedback that leads to stronger, more original work. Students will also develop a greater understanding of the critical and cultural lineage of their work. Discussions and assignments will address the craft of writers foundational to the study of fiction. Conferences and independent projects will focus on literary journals and the submission process, when appropriate.


Fall 2019 Graduate Course Offerings


Graduate Writing for English - EH 502 | Cesarini
T, 6:00 to 8:30

Our work as researchers and teachers does not necessarily make us good writers. There are varieties of academic writing in English, all with their own conventions that can be learned. Students in EH 502 will study representative examples of scholarly writing in English, so that we can understand its diversity over time, across sub-fields, and in different venues. Students will also undertake their own projects, in studied steps, from project proposal, to literature review, to annotated bibliography, culminating with a conference paper.


Teaching College Writing - EH 505 | Shaw
MW, 2:30 to 3:45

This course examines issues in composition history, theory, and pedagogy in the context of teaching first-year composition. Students will use this knowledge to develop course material appropriate to teaching first-year composition. Topics include syllabus and assignment design, lesson planning, course management, teaching in the linguistically and culturally diverse classroom, and assessment. Pre-requisite / Co-requisite: EH 502.


Medieval Literature - EH 570 | Halbrooks
W, 6:00 to 8:30

This course will consider various forms of self-construction in ancient, medieval, and early modern texts. Our main focus will be the "heroic" self in medieval literature, its roots in both the ancient epic and confessional literature, and its radical reshaping in the early modern period. We will read major texts by Sir Thomas Malory, Augustine, the "Gawain Poet," and Chaucer, along with other contextual selections.


Contemporary Fiction - EH 573 | St. Clair
M, 6:00 to 8:30

Nothing essential happens in the absence of sound. In this graduate seminar we’ll listen to a handful of contemporary novels and discuss the ways in which music, sound technology, and audible culture increasingly shape the literary fiction of the twenty-first century. In addition to the readings, coursework will include presentations and a seminar paper as the cumulative final project.


Madness in Conrad - EH 577 | Harrington
TR, 2:00 to 3:15

“Ever any madness in your family?” the doctor asks Marlow in Heart of Darkness, gesturing toward the Victorians’ fears of hereditary madness and setting up the madness of this dark tale. Unexpectedly, the fiction of Joseph Conrad features urban as well as colonial and shipboard settings and developed portrayals of women as well as introspective sailors. He draws on adventure and sensational fiction to consider the instability of narrative, race and evolution, sexuality, and women’s liberation, offering a fascinating perspective on late Victorian period while engaging the themes of modernism.


Graduate Fiction Workshop I/II - EH 583/4 | Prince
R, 6:00 to 8:30

This course is a seminar, writing workshop, and directed-study for intermediate and experienced writers of fiction. Through tailored writing projects that range from short stories, novellas, and novel excerpts, students will learn to utilize peer and instructor feedback that leads to stronger, more original work. Students will also develop a greater understanding of the critical and cultural lineage of their work. Discussions and assignments will address the craft of writers foundational to the study of fiction. Conferences and independent projects will focus on literary journals and the submission process, when appropriate.


Topics in Creative Writing - EH 591 | Poole
M, 6:00 to 8:30

What is the difference between plagiarism and appropriation? In this graduate special-topics course, there isn’t one. We will be cheats and scoundrels. We will learn the art of the takeover as we write poems, essays, and stories. We will also read contemporary literature in which authors intentionally retell, rework, and reuse things they did not invent, including advertisements, Greco-Roman myths, news reports, found documents, literary characters, and fictional settings. We will follow their lead as we pluck things from the culture around us to revise, decontextualize, and remake. We will get away with it all red-handed.


Thesis Hours - EH 599

Please see Dr. Halbrooks if you would like to register for thesis hours and have not already discussed your committee, graduation requirements, etc.