English Course Offerings

The English Department's course offerings vary by semester. We offer 100-level composition courses, 200-level introductory courses, 300-level intermediate courses, 400-level advanced courses, and 500-level graduate courses.

▼   FALL 2022: Themed Composition Sections (100 LEVEL)

Fall 2022 Themed Composition Sections


EH 102.801 - Tale of Two Americas | Arras
WEB

Through our own writing and reading, we will explore what it means to be "American" in our increasingly divided and polarized society. We will explore our multiple identities through an intersectional lens and grapple with questions of race, gender, class, politics, and place. Our writing assignments will help us both wrestle with and untangle our often unspoken identities, and help us not only more deeply discover ourselves and our role in this world but, ultimately, help us find ways to bridge the larger divides in our society.


EH 102 - Writing In and About Social Networks | Cowley
Section 107 MWF 9:05-9:55
Section 112 MWF 10:10-11:00

How has the recent emergence of social media platforms as well as new digital forms of communication technologies impacted the ways in which we read, write, socialize, and even think? Have social media platforms like Twitter, Instagram, and Tik-Tok made us more informed and connected as a society? Or rather, are these social networks to blame for the rising amounts of social divisiveness, cultural anxiety, and political misinformation that increasingly characterize our present historical moment? These are only some of the questions that we will discuss, read, and — of course — write about during the course of the semester. As a composition class, we will write academic summaries, comparative analyses, critical evaluations, and research papers that will respond to the ongoing scholarly debate about social networks as a new form of literacy and media.


EH 102 - The Human Question | Dail
Section 108 MWF 9:05-9:55
Section 120 MWF 11:15-12:05

The long-pondered question, "What does it mean to be human?" is still a focus of study and research across many different disciplines. This question can be explored through our role as human in nature, in relationship with animals and other humans, how we interact with environments around us, and how we view other cultures and identities of humans. In this section of English Composition 102, we will explore this question and its many possible answers through a variety of readings. We will subsequently attempt to answer this question in our own writing as we move through the semester.


EH 102.118 - African American Experience in a Pluralistic Society | Jackson
MWF 11:15-12:05

What we will do in this class is write essays that may help restore integrity onto terms such as pluralistic society, race, racism, prejudice, bigotry, bias, and racism.  As citizen scholars and neighbors, we will wallow in the complexity of stereotypes and judgments.  We will take our initial cue from Joseph A. Brown, SJ as we explore matters of race and ethnicity, which poses the underlying question for our composition class, "Who defines the terms by which we live?" This question will become central to understanding all implied in the term pluralistic society.


EH 102.158 - Writing about Film, Television, and New Media | Rands
Section 113 MWF 10:10-11:00
Section 150 MWF 12:20-1:10

This themed section of 102 will focus on analyzing and constructing arguments about visual media. This course will challenge students to approach texts they might already consume regularly (such as films, television shows, YouTube videos, and more) with a critical eye. The course will consist of assignments (such as a rhetorical analysis of a music video and critical evaluation of a film) to build toward a researched argument centering around visual media. The course will benefit students who intend to study film, communication, creative writing, literature, or anyone who simply has an interest in learning more about visual texts.


▼   FALL 2022: Themed Lit Surveys (200 LEVEL)

Fall 2022 Themed Literature Surveys


EH 216.102 - British Lit after 1785 | Harrington
Doubles and Imposters
MWF 11:15-12:05

Interested in the idea of a monstrous double — or individuals who are not what they seem to be? This Survey of British Literature after 1785 considers interesting pairings from the horrific to the humorous in British literature from the Romantic period to the present. We will use these doubles and imposters to investigate race and gender, nation and empire, guilt and innocence, and memory and identity in a sampling of texts ranging from Frankenstein to Monty Python and beyond.


EH 225 - American Literature before 1865 | McLaughlin
American Fanatics, Heretics, and Rebels
EH 225.107 TR 11:00-12:15
EH 225.109 TR 12:30-1:45

The story we tell ourselves about our Puritan forbears is one in which a courageous band of faithful Christians create a "city upon a hill" as a beacon of religious tolerance and good will. But, in fact, from the 17th century’s three "crime waves" — the Antinomian Controversy, the Quaker Persecutions, and the Salem Witch Trials — to the three Great Awakenings of the 18th and 19th centuries, religious controversy and intolerance have been the order of the day. This course examines the highs and the lows of our spotted religious history and their impact on American literature.


EH 235.101 - World Lit before 1650 | Peterson
Our World Commonalities
MWF 11:15-12:05

Ever wonder about the common bonds we share with others in the world in history, culture, faith, and heritage?  In this class, we will explore these bonds through a study of: creation stories in Islamic, Hebrew, Greek and Roman traditions; flood narratives with Gilgamesh and Noah; humankind’s hubris with Homer, Milton, and Biblical narratives; the epics of Virgil, Homer, Beowulf, and Dante; the philosophies of Socrates, Plato, Jesus, and the Koran; the Middle Ages tales of Chaucer, Boccacio, and Everyman; poetry from Sappho to Shakespeare, and lastly the tragedies of two sons seeking divine retribution for regicide in Oedipus Rex and Hamlet. We may discover that we have more in common than not!


EH 236 - World Lit after 1650 | Roddy
Narratives of Identity
EH 236.106 MWF 10:10-11:00
EH 236.108 MWF 1:25-2:15

Murder, madness, betrayal — great literature (like life) is filled with conflict and tragedy. In this collaborative section of EH 236, students investigate how literature reflects, challenges, and shapes cultural narratives of identity. How do international writers critique the religious and intellectual status quo to forge new concepts of national identity and personhood? How do imperialism, crushing worldwide violence, and emerging thinkers, like Freud and Marx, influence evolving literary ideas of nationalism, the human psyche, and communal identity? Can literature serve a liberatory role, reimagining the nature of subjectivity and cultural identity in an increasingly globalized, media-saturated world?


▼   FALL 2022: Upper-Division Courses (300/400 LEVEL)

Fall 2022 Upper-Division Courses


EH 300.101 - Introduction to Literary Study | Cesarini
TR 12:30-1:45

What makes a work of literature work? How to address this question, and how to develop our understandings of literature in writing, will be the focus of the course. We will study fundamental and more specialized literary terms and concepts, and a range of literary genres, periods, and cultures, as these all matter to how we read. We will also survey several of the most influential theories of literary study. Students will make one presentation in class, and they will write three essays.


EH 320.101 - Shakespeare’s Plays | Hillyer
TR 2:00-3:15

We will be studying a selection of Shakespeare plays drawn from all of the kinds he wrote (comedies, histories, romances, and tragedies), with a particular emphasis on their political resonance both in their own time and since. We will be considering the plays as plays, meaning that we will focus on such drama-specific features as the use of soliloquies and asides. At the same time, we will target portions of the plays for close-reading analyses of the kind best suited to enhancing an understanding of any kind of literature.


EH 371.102 - Approaches to English Grammar (W) | Amare
TR 11:00-12:15

This course is designed for individuals who want a working knowledge of grammar and usage. In addition to learning grammar and usage concepts, we will explore different approaches to teaching grammar. You will research articles about the changing role of grammar in the English Studies curriculum to help you contextualize these concepts within the larger debate of English Studies and the teaching of grammar.


EH 372.101 - Technical Writing | Beason
MWF 2:30-3:20

This course prepares students to write and edit documents associated with workplace
discourse, especially documents related to "technical" issues in a given field.  Such technical issues might deal with science, medicine, and engineering — but all academic fields, including English, call for situations when a writer has to compose documents that involve specialized knowledge, formal stylistic choices, and specific genres of writing that a writer is expected to follow.  As one means of achieving these goals, this section of EH 372 will have students compose a formal proposal for a public memorial dedicated to an under-appreciated person or group.  For English majors and minors interested in one day having a job associated with editing or workplace writing, this course offers valuable academic training and instruction.


EH 372.102 - Technical Writing (W) | Guzy
MWF 1:25-2:15

This course will introduce you to types of written and oral communication used in workplace settings, with a focus on technical reporting and editing. Through several document cycles, you will develop skills in managing the organization, development, style, and visual format of various documents. Types of workplace writing will include reports, proposals, job application materials, correspondence, and instructional manuals. Evaluation will emphasize comprehensive content, concise language, appropriate visual design, and professional correctness in grammar and mechanics.


EH 372.801 - Technical Writing (W) | Amare
WEB

The course is designed to help you to accomplish the following:

  • Understand and analyze writing situations and technologies and invoke the roles and strategies necessary to produce effective writing in localized and globalized contexts.
  • Improve your understanding of how writing practices and genres (memos, email, proposals, reports, and websites) function within and across organizations, including how various readers read, where readers look for information, and what multiple purposes documents serve inside and outside particular situations.
  • Produce more effective visual, textual, and multimedia documents.

EH 372.802 and EH 372.803 - Technical Writing | Garner
WEB

Practicing professionals of any discipline are required to do some sort of writing. This course is designed to give students experience with work place writing through various assignments: correspondence letters, memos, reports, document design, and job application preparation. This course aims to improve mastery of the whole process of genre writing from the conceptual stage through the editing stage. Additionally, students will learn to recognize and adapt their writing to fit various contexts, genres, and situations.


EH 372.804 - Technical Writing (W) | Gandy
WEB

Technical communicators make scientific, technical, and other practical knowledge available to a variety of audiences in various media, such as print, video, and digital.

In EH 372 Technical Writing students learn, both individually and as team members,
professional level writing, thinking, and audience-targeting skills to produce everything from technical reports to planning proposals for a variety of organizations and businesses, such as automobile, computer, aeronautics, medical and environmental institutions.

The course will balance individual report writing assignments with team projects, which combine written and PowerPoint oral presentation. As aspiring professionals, students simulate working as team members with engineers, researchers and business executives in producing reports and articles for publication in specialized technical journals or for dissemination to the general public.


EH 373.101 - Writing in Professions (W) | Beason
MWF 11:15-12:05

This course prepares you to write in one or more professions.  To do so, we will focus on four foundational elements that help people write in the workplace. To achieve such goals and translate them into daily activities, we will spend time on the following:
planning/drafting/revising; analyzing writing; analyzing hypothetical situations, collaborating with one another; and conducting hands-on investigations of actual workplace writing.


EH 391.101 - Fiction Writing | Prince
TR 9:30-10:45

The objective of the class is to introduce students to the art of fiction writing. In this class, we read fiction not so much for "meaning" or "theme" but for technique. We’re interested in how stories are built in order to gain insight into how we might build them ourselves. A popular myth is that good writing is primarily built on inspiration and something we call "natural talent," but the very existence of this course implies otherwise. And nearly every accomplished fiction writer will tell you that his or her success is owing mostly to studied technique and a whole lot of work. Here is where that technique, where that hard work begins.


EH 395.101 - Poetry Writing: Spoken Word and Other Forms | Pence
TR 2:00-3:15

Poet Richard Wilbur once remarked that "whatever margins the page might offer have nothing to do with the form of a poem." In this course centered on the writing of poetry, we will accept Wilbur’s challenge and learn the variety of ways we can give shape to our lyrical expressions. We will practice writing poems in different modes and forms, from the intellectual slinkiness of Shakespeare’s sonnets to the cosmic embrace of Whitman’s freeverse. Our focus will not be so much on the rules regulating each form, but on the deep history, artistry, and context behind those rules so that we can begin to choose the right form for our own poems' content. In workshop, our poems will be read, critiqued, and evaluated with the goal of a polished manuscript to be presented by the semester’s end.


EH 401.101 - Teaching Composition (W) | Guzy
MWF 11:15-12:05

This course will introduce you to theories of composition and their applications for teaching writing at the middle school and high school levels. In a seminar-style format, you will:

  • read and discuss the required texts;

  • lead a discussion of a journal article from English Journal or Voices from the Middle, which are professional journals published by the National Council of Teachers of English;

  • practice evaluating batches of student essays;

  • demonstrate a 30- to 50-minute writing lesson; and

  • design (1) a 9-week or an 18-week composition syllabus or (2) detailed daily lesson plans for a shorter composition unit, either of which to be supported by an 8- to 10-page research-based rationale.


EH 404.101 - Grant Proposal Writing | Amare
TR 9:30-10:45

Grant funding is vital for the sustainability of many organizations. These funds are often procured through successful grant proposals. Grant writing is a competitive but important field that enables writers to meaningfully contribute to causes and organizations reliant on external monetary support.

In this course, students will learn: 

  • Grant writing fundamentals
  • To discern between corporate, private, and government funding sources
  • How and where to find relevant funding opportunities
  • Grant budget and budget narrative development skills
  • Data management and evaluation plan essentials
  • The craft of composing grant proposal narratives

Students will gain applied experience across all of these forefronts, preparing them to write competitive grant applications in the real world. By the end of this course, successful students will have proven their abilities to find and assess funding opportunities, to develop a grant budget and budget sheet, and to write a grant application and all of the supplementary documents in response to a real funding opportunity.


EH 422.101 - Literary Criticism Since 1900 (W) | McLaughlin
TR 3:30-4:45

This course examines the ways in which we read, introducing important strategies developed in the twentieth century for engaging with literary texts. By the end of this course, you will be able to bring theoretical paradigms such as deconstruction, feminism, new historicism, phenomenology, and psychoanalysis to bear on what you read.


EH 475.101 - 19th Century Literature | Harrington
TR 12:30-1:45

When the arch-villian Fosco of Wilkie Collins’s The Woman in White exclaims, "What a situation! I suggest it to the rising romance writers of England," he draws attention to the sensation novel’s place in the expanding literary marketplace of Victorian Britain. Popular novels attract a readership across classes, specifically targeting women as readers and influencing literature of all kinds. This class will examine Gothic tropes in both literary and popular novels from the mid- and late-nineteenth century, looking at the way these often-melodramatic texts comment on significant political and social issues of the day, including the Woman Question and manhood, varieties of sexuality, religion and morality, atavism and degeneracy, human psychology, class, and empire and the nation, as well as their relationship to the marketplace.


EH 483.101 - Advanced Fiction Writing | Johnson
W 6:00-8:30

This workshop-style course is devoted to the writing and discussion of literary fiction — and what exactly that term means today. The fiction you write throughout the semester can be set anywhere, during any time period imaginable, but it should demonstrate a deep engagement with and respect for elements of craft and technique. In doing so our hope is that by the end of the semester you will have a piece of fiction that's close, if not ready, to submit for publication. To steer this endeavor, we'll read Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel; Meander, Spiral, Explode by Jane Alison; and various short stories and essays. In my experience writing fiction is often a dirty and difficult process, especially in revision. Our task in this course will involve figuring out how to best make that process work for you in getting your singular visions onto the page. 


▼   FALL 2022: Graduate Courses (500 LEVEL)

Fall 2022 Graduate Courses


EH 502.501 - Graduate Writing for English | Cesarini
R 6:00-8:30

EH 502 prepares students for research and academic writing at the graduate level in English studies. Graduate-level study of English means a direct engagement with the institutions (especially the academic institutions) in which literature in English takes its place. Improving your ability to enter into the academic conversations and discourses around literature will therefore be a very important part of our work. The course will be writing intensive, and you will become better acquainted with and more fluent in several genres of academic writing in English.


EH 505.101 - Teaching College Writing | Shaw
MW 3:30-4:45

This course examines the issues in composition history, theory, and pedagogy in the context of teaching first-year composition. Students will use this knowledge to develop course material appropriate to teaching first-year composition. Topics include syllabus and assignment design, lesson planning, course management, teaching in the linguistically and culturally diverse classroom, and assessment. Pre-requisite/Co-requisite: EH 502.


EH 520.501 - Studies in Shakespeare | Hillyer
T 6:00-8:30

We will be studying a selection of Shakespeare plays drawn from all of the kinds he wrote (comedies, histories, romances, and tragedies), with a particular emphasis on their political resonance both in their own time and since. We will be considering the plays as plays, meaning that we will focus on such drama-specific features as the use of soliloquies and asides. At the same time, we will target portions of the plays for close-reading analyses of the kind best suited to enhancing an understanding of any kind of literature. Given that the main assignment will be a research paper produced in stages, we will in addition address repeatedly the issue of how the content we are examining might suggest topics for further exploration, both within and across individual plays.


EH 572.501 - Modern American Fiction | Raczkowski
M 6:00-8:30

The broader goal of the course is to provide you with an introduction to the different and sometimes competing forms the modernist narrative fiction took in America in the first half of the 20th century. In short, while the term "modernism" captured a fundamental desire for change and a rejection of the past, different "modernisms" in America had very different ideas about what kind of aesthetic, cultural and political change were desirable. Over the course of the semester, we will have an opportunity to consider how so-called high modernism, black modernism, left (or proletarian) modernism, queer modernism and popular modernism both overlapped with each other in important ways and yet were still engaged in critical debates with each other over the meaning of American culture and history.


EH 583.501 - Grad Fiction Writing Workshop I | Johnson
W 6:00-8:30

This workshop-style course is devoted to the writing and discussion of literary fiction — and what exactly that term means today. The fiction you write throughout the semester can be set anywhere, during any time period imaginable, but it should demonstrate a deep engagement with and respect for elements of craft and technique. In doing so our hope is that by the end of the semester you will have a piece of fiction that's close, if not ready, to submit for publication. To steer this endeavor, we'll read Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel; Meander, Spiral, Explode by Jane Alison; and various short stories and essays. In my experience writing fiction is often a dirty and difficult process, especially in revision. Our task in this course will involve figuring out how to best make that process work for you in getting your singular visions onto the page. 


EH 590.701 - Special Topics: The Long Form | Pence
TR 3:30-4:45

A book-length writing project differs from a short writing project in multiple ways, including scope, research methodology, and the writing process itself from start to finish. This course is designed for graduate students in at least their second-year who are engaged in a book-length project. The class will focus on outlining, structure, research techniques, and revision strategies when undergoing a long project. Craft essays will be studied as will books with innovative structures in three major genres: poetry, memoir, and fiction. Books include Nox by Anne Carson, In the Dream House by Carmen Maria Machado, and an interrelated collection of short stories.


EH 591.501 - Topics in Creative Writing: Writing The Self | Pence
R 6:00-8:30

The relationship between the writer and the first-person speaker in creative writing is not a simple one. It is continually mediated through figurative language, omissions, dramatic irony, subject layering, and the creation of reliability (or the intentional lack of it). As Emily Dickinson wrote in a letter to Higginson: "When I state myself, as the Representative of the Verse — it does not mean — me — but a supposed person." In this creative writing workshop, we will look at how each genre crafts and subverts the use of first-person narration in poetry, creative nonfiction, and fiction. In fact, one could argue that what divides these genres is the construction of first-person and its relationship to the writer’s personal and imagined experience. As a way to aid our own understanding of the first-person narrator, we will read texts that offer differing strategies including work by Dean Radar, Alexander Chee, and Maggie Nelson. A final portfolio of original work in poetry, creative nonfiction, and fiction with a critical introduction; a craft presentation; and attendance at two readings will constitute the course's major requirements.


 

A full listing of all courses in the departmental catalog is available via the University Bulletin.  For a listing of courses offered in a given semester, please visit PAWS.  Enter the catalog term you wish to search and select "English" as the subject on the page that follows.