English Course Offerings

The English Department's course offerings vary by semester. We offer 100-level composition courses, 200-level introductory courses, 300-level intermediate courses, 400-level advanced courses, and 500-level graduate courses. For a listing of everything in the departmental catalog, please visit:

https://www.southalabama.edu/bulletin/current/courses/english/index.html

For a listing of courses offered in a given semester, please visit PAWS. Enter the catalog term you wish to search and select "English" as the subject on the following page.


Spring 2020 Undergraduate Course Offerings


Introduction to Literary Study - EH 300 | Raczkowski
MWF, 1:25 to 2:15

"city, n. 1. A place to live, usually with corrupt mayors and lots of pollution. The real world is only in the city, not on Ole McD’s Farm – Urban Dictionary."  This simultaneous repulsion and attraction to the City (it’s corrupt / it’s the real world) animates a lot of twentieth-century literature and film. Think of this class as a semester long study of literature’s strange, conflicted fascination with the modern city that aims to instruct students in the fundamental practices of literary study: close reading, literary analysis, research, and ironic eye-rolling.


Chaucer - EH 315 | Halbrooks
TR, 11:00 to 12:15

Chaucer is at the same time the most welcoming and the most unknowable of poets. His personable narrative voice and his self-deprecating poetic personality seem so simple, and yet they mask dazzling complexity, poetic subtlety, and political ambivalence. This course will survey the major works of this essential poet, especially The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde. No prior knowledge of Middle English is required.


Shakespeare's Comedies and Romances - EH 322 | Hillyer
MWF, 12:20 to 1:10

We will be studying representative examples of Shakespeare's plays in two genres: comedies and romances. We will collectively read aloud selected passages from these plays, in part to practice detailed textual analysis, and in part to grasp key interactions among the leading characters. I will assign two short papers (3-4 pages), a midterm, and a final. That final will require familiarity with the USA theater department's production of A Midsummer Night's Dream, which we will be reading at about the same time. Thus, you will be forced to have the enjoyable experience of watching one of the funniest and most inventive plays ever written.


British Romanticism - EH 351 | Hollingsworth
MWF, 11:15 to 12:05

Our goal is to deepen our understanding of the complex and seductive dynamism of British Romanticism—especially the tension between a sovereign, redemptive Nature and the perilous labyrinth of Gothic experience. In an effort to understand the double soul of Romanticism, its transcendent goodness as well as its hunger for darkness, we will read and discuss classic works such as William Wordsworth’s “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s “Kubla Khan,” Thomas De Quincey’s Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, and Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights.


19th Century British Novel - EH 354 | Harrington
TR, 2:00 to 3:15

The prolific periodical culture of the nineteenth century and the increasing literacy rate produced a boom in British fiction that resulted in a rich array of novels, at turns realist, domestic, Gothic, sentimental, and naturalist. In this class, we will consider issues of gender and sexuality in Austen’s Emma, Brontë’s Wuthering Heights, Dickens’s Great Expectations, Eliot’s Silas Marner, Collins’s The Moonstone, and Hardy’s Tess. Discussion topics will include childhood and development, rights and reform, class, race, and empire.


British Novel since 1945 - EH 365 | St. Clair
TR, 3:30 to 4:45

By popular demand, the syllabus has been shortened! Less reading! More fun! Maybe even a few YA novels! [Okay, I’m lying about that last part. No YA novels. I haven’t taken leave of my senses.] Readings will include John Fowles’s The French Lieutenant’s Woman (1969), Angela Carter’s Nights at the Circus (1984), Julian Barnes’s A History of the World in 10½ Chapters (1989), Tom McCarthy’s Satin Island (2015), Ali Smith’s Spring (2019), and Salman Rushdie’s Quichotte (2019).


Approaches to English Grammar (W) - EH 371 | Beason
TR, 2:00 to 3:15

So what is a dangling participle anyway? EH 371 offers students a valuable intellectual and practical skill: the ability to analyze and describe in technical terms how a given sentence is structured (beyond just saying it does or doesn’t “flow”). While the course was originally developed for students planning to teach English courses at the secondary level, EH 371 is useful for just about anyone wanting to edit, write, analyze literary texts, teach non-native speakers of English, practice law, or learn more about the English language. EH 371 is also a W-course and can help fulfill the W-course requirement for English majors and many other students.


Technical Writing (W) - EH 372 | Guzy
MWF, 10:10 to 11:00

The purpose of this course is to train students in the kinds of written reports required of practicing professionals, aiming to improve mastery of the whole process of report writing from conceptual stage through editing stage. This course will introduce you to types of written and oral communication used in workplace settings, with a focus on technical reporting and editing. Through several document cycles, you will develop skills in managing the organization, development, style, and visual format of various documents.


Science Fiction - EH 380 | Beason
MWF, 9:05 to 9:55

Not intended for mere “fans,” EH 380 enables us to better define, analyze, and interpret science fiction. Our focus will be modern short stories, along with a few films and novels. Questions we will explore include the following. Why does science fiction express both our love and fear of technology? Is religion a counterpart or antithesis to science? How does science fiction both complicate and sustain conventional notions of gender? And what do these stories suggest about being “fully human” and “good” in an impersonal technological era?


American Civil Rights in Literature - EH 390 | Jackson
TR, 9:30 to 10:45

Over the course of the semester you can expect to read a wide variety of texts in a wide range of genres and modes, ranging from oral history, speeches, and poetry from the 1960s to films, graphic novels and short stories written as recently as this past year. You can expect to compose texts in a variety of different genres and modes over the course of the semester, ranging from traditional literary analysis to visual presentation and a multimodal narrative based on original archival research.


Fiction Writing - EH 391 | Poole
TR, 3:30 to 4:45

This course will introduce students to the art of short fiction and contemporary practitioners. We will read short fiction not so much for "meaning" or "theme" but for technique. We’re interested in how stories are built in order to gain insight into how we might build them ourselves. A popular myth is that good writing is built on inspiration and "natural talent," but the very existence of this course implies otherwise. And nearly every accomplished fiction writer will tell you that his or her success is owing mostly to studied technique, careful reading, and a whole lot of experimentation.


Rhetoric: Ancient and Modern - EH 402 | Shaw
TR, 11:00 to 12:15

Beginning with the early sophists of Periclean Athens and ending in the twenty-first century, this course examines and compares various movements in the history of rhetoric, with particular emphasis on the relationship between rhetorical strategy and one’s image of human beings. The course aims to increase the scope of students’ understanding of rhetoric and help them apply this knowledge to their own communication and to their evaluation of the communications of others.


Literary Criticism since 1900 (W) - EH 422 | St. Clair
TR, 12:30 to 1:45

The single most important course an English major could possibly take, EH 422 provides an introduction to the critical, cultural, and linguistic theories that define the discipline. Take this course and finally learn how to read! Five stars on Amazon. 4.8 on TripAdvisor. Not sold in stores. Void where prohibited.


Studies in Film: Adaptation - EH 478 | McLaughlin
MW, 5:00 to 6:15; M 6:30 to 9:00

Because the theme of this course is adaptation, we will be watching films and reading the novels, short stories, or plays upon which they have been based. The two central and interrelated questions we will address are how and why screenplay writers and film directors choose to deviate from or align themselves with the original texts in the ways that they do. One of the major assignments will be to write a short screenplay. (Please note that some of the films may be offensive to the squeamish.)


Rhetoric and Religion - EH 481 | Shaw
TR, 2:00 to 3:15

This course explores the relationship between rhetoric and religion. It is not a course on theology. Rather, it is an inquiry into how two powerful cultural elements inform each other. We will begin by examining the influence that classical Greek rhetoric has on the formation of early Christianity, and we will end by examining how Christianity informs language theory in the modern and postmodern eras. While the greater part of the course will focus on rhetoric and Christianity, the connections between rhetoric and Judaism and rhetoric and Islam will also be explored.


Native American Literature - EH 482 | Cesarini
M, 6:00 to 8:30

Students will read novels and short stories by Native American writers active from about 1940 until the present, such as Darcy McNickle, N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, Louise Erdrich, Sherman Alexie, and LeAnne Howe. Our study will be to understand as much of each writer's Native/national culture and history as needed to understand and appreciate their works of fiction. Graded work will consist of weekly quizzes and two essays.


Advanced Poetry Writing - EH 485 | Pence
W, 6:00 to 8:30

This advanced poetry writing course examines the contemporary lyric and asks what are its craft elements that create what Auden defines poetry to be: “memorable speech.” We will study a range of contemporary poets to understand our role within the lyrical tradition. To help us gain an understanding of this vibrant field, our class has the opportunity to meet guest poets this semester who include James Davis May and Chelsea Rathburn. A final portfolio of original poetry will constitute the course’s major requirements.


Screenwriting for Television - EH 488 | Prince
R, 6:00 to 8:30

This class focuses on the fundamentals of screenwriting for television. We will study character development, conflict, structure, formatting, and so on as we explore how to write screenplays. Our focus will be as expansive as possible, covering drama, comedy, and action genres. Students will write one research paper and work on both an hour and a half-hour TV pilot.


The Twilight Zone (H) - EH 490 | Guzy
MWF, 9:05 to 9:55

This honors seminar will examine themes, tropes, and milestone episodes from the original Twilight Zone series, tracing its influences throughout popular culture over the past five decades and identifying key narrative concepts and production techniques as applied in contemporary media.


Spring 2020 Graduate Course Offerings


Introduction to Critical Theory - EH 501 | Vrana
T, 6:00 to 8:30

EH 501 provides an introduction to some of the most essential debates within and approaches to critical theory and literary criticism. We will read excerpts by important theorists grouped topically and focus on effective methods of bringing these wide-ranging lenses to a primary text (or two) of African American literature. Discussion, written responses, presentations, and two papers will develop students’ facility at and comfort with engaging theory going forward, regardless of the particular object of analysis.


Rhetoric and Religion - EH 507 | Shaw
TR, 2:00 to 3:15

This course explores the relationship between rhetoric and religion. It is not a course on theology. Rather, it is an inquiry into how two powerful cultural elements inform each other. We will begin by examining the influence that classical Greek rhetoric has on the formation of early Christianity, and we will end by examining how Christianity informs language theory in the modern and postmodern eras. While the greater part of the course will focus on rhetoric and Christianity, the connections between rhetoric and Judaism and rhetoric and Islam will also be explored.


Early Romantics - EH 532 | Hollingsworth
W, 6:00 to 8:30

We will approach Romanticism as a literature of transformation, power, and the dangerous pursuit of truth and authenticity through extremity, the primitive, and the occult. Our focus will be the role of folk and Gothic themes in foundational British and American Romantic texts. In addition to examples of the German Romantic fairy tale tradition, and Horace Walpole’s elemental Gothic, The Castle of Otranto, we will read works by writers such as William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Thomas De Quincey, Mary Shelley, Emily Bronte, Edgar Allen Poe, and Frederick Douglass.


Grad Poetry Writing Workshop I/II - EH 585/6 | Pence
W, 6:00 to 8:30

This advanced poetry writing course examines the contemporary lyric and asks what are its craft elements that create what Auden defines poetry to be: “memorable speech.” We will study a range of contemporary poets to understand our role within the lyrical tradition. To help us gain an understanding of this vibrant field, our class has the opportunity to meet guest poets this semester who include James Davis May and Chelsea Rathburn. A final portfolio of original poetry will constitute the course’s major requirements.


American War Fiction - EH 590 | Trout
R, 6:00 to 8:30

What is a true war story? And who gets to tell it? This course will explore these questions by examining a compelling assortment of texts, including Willa Cather's One of Ours, Ellen La Motte's The Backwash of War, William Faulkner's Flags in the Dust, Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms, Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five, and Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried.


Screenwriting for Television - EH 591 | Prince
R, 6:00 to 8:30

This class focuses on the fundamentals of screenwriting for television. We will study character development, conflict, structure, formatting, and so on as we explore how to write screenplays. Our focus will be as expansive as possible, covering drama, comedy, and action genres. Students will write one research paper and work on both an hour and a half-hour TV pilot.


Native American Literature - EH 592 | Cesarini
M, 6:00 to 8:30

Students will read novels and short stories by Native American writers active from about 1940 until the present, such as Darcy McNickle, N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, Louise Erdrich, Sherman Alexie, and LeAnne Howe. Our study will be to understand as much of each writer's Native/national culture and history as needed to understand and appreciate their works of fiction. Graded work will consist of weekly quizzes and two essays.


Thesis Hours - EH 599

Please see Dr. Harrington if you would like to register for thesis hours and have not already discussed your committee, graduation requirements, etc.