Graduate Courses

"The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid."

- Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey (1817)

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Fall 2020 Graduate Courses


EH 502: GRADUATE WRITING FOR ENGLISH | McLaughlin
W 6:00 - 8:30

EH 502 is required of all M.A. students in their first year of course work. The central purpose of this course is to prepare students for research and academic writing at the graduate level, but it also aims to prepare students for direct engagement with the academic conversations, discourses, and practices that circulate around and through the study of literature — in this case, the literature that has grown out of the myths, legends, and folktales of ancient Greece and Rome.


EH 513: STUDIES IN CHAUCER | Halbrooks
M 6:00 - 8:30

This course will survey the major works of the most important writer of the English Middle Ages, as well as the vast history of Chaucerian scholarship and criticism. Each generation of scholars creates multiple alternative "Chaucers." We have genial Chaucer, feminist Chaucer, misogynist Chaucer, radical Chaucer, conservative Chaucer, postmodern Chaucer, and even eco-Chaucer to name just a few. We will consider which of these alternative Chaucers we find most convincing, or we might have to create our own.


EH 572: MODERN AMERICAN FICTION | Raczkowski
R 6:00 - 8:30

The modernist novel in America was never singular, but took on a number of forms ranging from the experimental or “high” modernism of Gertrude Stein; to the popular modernism of James M. Cain’s hardboiled crime novels; to the Harlem Renaissance modernism of Nella Larsen or Claude McKay. As a study of modernist fiction in America, the goal of this class will be to introduce students to some of these different modernisms while keeping an eye on the competing aesthetic and political arguments that modernist writers structured implicitly in their fiction and explicitly in their manifestoes, reviews and literary criticism.


EH 589: THE ART OF THE ESSAY | Poole
T 6 - 8:30

In this course we will read contemporary essays as writers, experimenting with writing assignments along the way as we explore this multi-faceted, ever-expanding genre of creative writing. We will work in several modalities of the creative-essay, including the memoir essay, the lyric essay, and the immersive (gonzo!) quasi-journalist essay. We will workshop each other’s essays and share our exercises, taking risks, and ultimately seeking to find our voices as truth tellers. At the end of class, we will assemble a portfolio of revised essays.


EH 590: CONTEMPORARY BLACK FICTION | Vrana
MWF 3:35 - 4:25

This course will examine post-1965 African American novelists’ representations of enslavement and other key events in distant and recent black history, with focus on how authors respond to the present by writing about race, gender, and politics in America’s past. We will discuss both realistic and imaginative or speculative depictions of the past. Texts may include: Beloved (Toni Morrison), The Chaneysville Incident (David Bradley), Leaving Atlanta (Tayari Jones), The Underground Railroad (Colson Whitehead), and Kindred (Octavia Butler).


EH 591: CRAFTING YOUR ECOSYSTEM | Pence
R 6:00 - 8:30

What happens when the environment is more than a setting but a subject of one's work — be it in a sci-fi story or ruminative personal essay? In this graduate class, we will explore how to create a nuanced environment in one's poetry, nonfiction, and fiction. Some questions we will address include how have we invented nature, both in our lives and in our creative work? What tools can writers use to convey the history of the land? And how can writers communicate natural or man-made disasters to a variety of readers?


EH 599: THESIS HOURS

Please see Dr. Harrington if you would like to register for thesis hours and have not already discussed your committee, graduation requirements, etc.


 

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