Graduate Courses


Fall 2021 Graduate Courses


EH 502: GRADUATE WRITING IN ENGLISH | Hollingsworth
M 6:00 - 8:30

We will investigate the type of Gothic that haunts the Cold War imagination. We will take an evolutionary perspective, exploring how the experience of mechanical time helps establish a new species of Gothic, science fiction, which after World War 2 increasingly saturates reality. Evaluation will emphasize research and the conference paper. This course is required of all MA students in their first year of work; its prerequisite is admission to the English Graduate Program.


EH 505: TEACHING COLLEGE WRITING | Shaw
MW 3:30 - 4:45

This course examines issues in composition history, theory, and pedagogy in the context of teaching first-year composition.  Students will use this knowledge to develop course material appropriate to teaching first-year composition.  Topics include syllabus and assignment design, lesson planning, course management, teaching in the linguistically and culturally diverse classroom, and assessment. Pre-requisite / Co-requisite: EH 502.


EH 570: STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE | Halbrooks
T 6:00 - 8:30

This course will focus on Medieval Ecologies from Beowulf to Tolkien.  We will study literary representations of travel, landscape, and ecology from the Middle Ages of northwestern Europe (primarily the British Isles, Scandinavia, and Iceland), as well as how these representations have interacted with modern literature and ideas.  In addition to our medieval and modern primary texts, we will read from the growing body of medievalist ecocriticism.


EH 583/4: GRADUATE FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP I/II | Prince
TR 12:30 - 1:45

This course is a seminar, writing workshop, and directed study for graduate writers of fiction. Through tailored writing projects that range from short stories, novellas, and novel excerpts, students will learn to utilize peer and instructor feedback that leads to stronger, more original work. Students will also develop a greater understanding of the critical and cultural lineage of their work. Discussions and assignments will address the craft of writers foundational to the study of fiction. Conferences and independent projects will focus on literary journals and the submission process, when appropriate.


EH 592: WOMEN AND THE MACABRE | McLaughlin
W 6:00 - 8:30

If it is true that the Enlightenment gave birth to the gothic, its light creating the dark shadows in which lurk that which resists human understanding, then it is equally true to say that the gothic, with its locus in the irrational maze of the human psyche, prefigured and gave rise to psychoanalysis. Because psychoanalysis could itself be called a gothic discourse with its exploration of family secrets, buried memories, hysterical fits, obsessive thoughts, erotic dreams, false portraits, and mirror images, it will be the theoretical lens through which we explore the relationship between women and the macabre in film and literature from the late-nineteenth century through the present.


EH 599: THESIS HOURS

Please see Dr. Halbrooks if you would like to register for thesis hours and have not already discussed your committee, graduation requirements, etc.